Catchment‐scale analysis of aquatic ecosystems

Catchment‐scale analysis of aquatic ecosystems Catchment-scale analysis of aquatic ecosystems J . D AV I D A L L A N A N D L U C I N D A B . J O H N S O N School of Natural Resources & Environment, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109–1115 U.S.A. Centre for Water and the Environment, Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota, 5013 Miller Trunk Highway, Duluth, MN 55811 U.S.A. Introduction Aquatic ecologists have a rich history of including a landscape perspective in theories about lakes and rivers. Position in the landscape and underlying geology provided critical insights into differences among lake types that led to the formation of lake trophic classification (Wetzel, 1983). Comparative studies of multiple lakes within a single lake district lent much impetus to the development of limnology since the early twentieth century (Pearsall, 1930; Macan, 1970), and continues to be a useful approach to this day (Schindler et al., 1990). Early studies of riverine systems emphasized physical and biological changes that occurred along a river’s course (Huet, 1949; Illies & Botosaneanu, 1963), leading to the formulation of the River Continuum Concept (Vannote et al., 1980), the template of which is longitudinal position. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Freshwater Biology Wiley

Catchment‐scale analysis of aquatic ecosystems

Freshwater Biology, Volume 37 (1) – Feb 1, 1997

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Blackwell Science Ltd, Oxford
ISSN
0046-5070
eISSN
1365-2427
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1365-2427.1997.00155.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Catchment-scale analysis of aquatic ecosystems J . D AV I D A L L A N A N D L U C I N D A B . J O H N S O N School of Natural Resources & Environment, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109–1115 U.S.A. Centre for Water and the Environment, Natural Resources Research Institute, University of Minnesota, 5013 Miller Trunk Highway, Duluth, MN 55811 U.S.A. Introduction Aquatic ecologists have a rich history of including a landscape perspective in theories about lakes and rivers. Position in the landscape and underlying geology provided critical insights into differences among lake types that led to the formation of lake trophic classification (Wetzel, 1983). Comparative studies of multiple lakes within a single lake district lent much impetus to the development of limnology since the early twentieth century (Pearsall, 1930; Macan, 1970), and continues to be a useful approach to this day (Schindler et al., 1990). Early studies of riverine systems emphasized physical and biological changes that occurred along a river’s course (Huet, 1949; Illies & Botosaneanu, 1963), leading to the formulation of the River Continuum Concept (Vannote et al., 1980), the template of which is longitudinal position.

Journal

Freshwater BiologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1997

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