Carbonic anhydrase and C 4 photosynthesis: a transgenic analysis

Carbonic anhydrase and C 4 photosynthesis: a transgenic analysis ABSTRACT Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyses the first reaction in the C4 photosynthetic pathway, the conversion of atmospheric CO2 to bicarbonate in the mesophyll cytosol. To examine the importance of the enzyme to the functioning of the C4 photosynthetic pathway, Flaveria bidentis (L.) Kuntze, a C4 dicot, was genetically transformed with an antisense construct in which the cDNA encoding a putative cytosolic CA (CA3) was placed under the control of a constitutive promoter. Some of the primary transformants had impaired CO2 assimilation rates and required high CO2 for growth. The T1 progeny of four primary transformants were used to examine the quantitative relationship between leaf CA activity and CO2 assimilation rate. CA activity was determined in leaf extracts with a mass spectrometric technique that measured the rate of 18O exchange from doubly labelled 13C18O2. Steady‐state CO2 assimilation rates were unaffected by a decrease in CA activity until CA activity was less than 20% of wild type when they decreased steeply. Transformants with less than 10% of wild‐type CA activity had very low CO2 assimilation rates and grew poorly at ambient CO2 partial pressure. Reduction in CA activity also increased the CO2 partial pressure required to saturate CO2 assimilation rates. The present data show that CA activity is essential for the functioning of the C4 photosynthetic pathway. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Cell & Environment Wiley

Carbonic anhydrase and C 4 photosynthesis: a transgenic analysis

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0140-7791
eISSN
1365-3040
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1365-3040.2003.01157.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT Carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) catalyses the first reaction in the C4 photosynthetic pathway, the conversion of atmospheric CO2 to bicarbonate in the mesophyll cytosol. To examine the importance of the enzyme to the functioning of the C4 photosynthetic pathway, Flaveria bidentis (L.) Kuntze, a C4 dicot, was genetically transformed with an antisense construct in which the cDNA encoding a putative cytosolic CA (CA3) was placed under the control of a constitutive promoter. Some of the primary transformants had impaired CO2 assimilation rates and required high CO2 for growth. The T1 progeny of four primary transformants were used to examine the quantitative relationship between leaf CA activity and CO2 assimilation rate. CA activity was determined in leaf extracts with a mass spectrometric technique that measured the rate of 18O exchange from doubly labelled 13C18O2. Steady‐state CO2 assimilation rates were unaffected by a decrease in CA activity until CA activity was less than 20% of wild type when they decreased steeply. Transformants with less than 10% of wild‐type CA activity had very low CO2 assimilation rates and grew poorly at ambient CO2 partial pressure. Reduction in CA activity also increased the CO2 partial pressure required to saturate CO2 assimilation rates. The present data show that CA activity is essential for the functioning of the C4 photosynthetic pathway.

Journal

Plant Cell & EnvironmentWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2004

References

  • Light induction and the effect of nitrogen status upon the activity of carbonic anhydrase in maize leaves
    Burnell, Burnell; Suzuki, Suzuki; Sugiyama, Sugiyama
  • Genetic transformation of the C 4 plant, Flaveria bidentis
    Chitty, Chitty; Furbank, Furbank; Marshall, Marshall; Chen, Chen; Taylor, Taylor
  • Naturally low carbonic anhydrase activity in C 4 and C 3 plants limits discrimination against C 18 OO during photosynthesis
    Gillon, Gillon; Yakir, Yakir
  • Effects of nitrate application on Amaranthus powellii wats. III. Optimal allocation of leaf nitrogen for photosynthesis and stomatal conductance
    Hunt, Hunt; Weber, Weber; Gates, Gates
  • Carbonic anhydrase of spinach. Studies on its location, inhibition, and physiological function
    Jacobson, Jacobson; Fong, Fong; Heath, Heath
  • Metabolic consequences of overproduction of phospho enol pyruvate carboxylase in C 3 plants
    Miyao, Miyao; Fukayama, Fukayama
  • Differential expression of the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase large subunit gene in the bundle sheath and mesophyll cells of developing maize leaves is influenced by light
    Sheen, Sheen; Bogorad, Bogorad

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