CARBON CONCENTRATING MECHANISMS IN AQUATIC PHOTOSYNTHETIC ORGANISMS: A REPORT ON CCM 2001

CARBON CONCENTRATING MECHANISMS IN AQUATIC PHOTOSYNTHETIC ORGANISMS: A REPORT ON CCM 2001 Algae have evolved in a wide variety of environmental conditions including extremes in temperature, pH, and nutrient availability; however, one potential limitation most free‐living algae face at some time is low CO 2 conditions. Reasons for this limitation include the low affinity of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RUBISCO) for CO 2 and the slow diffusion of CO 2 in aqueous environments. Even in environments relatively high in bicarbonate, such as seawater, the CO 2 concentration is only 10 μM. This value is lower than the measured K m (CO 2 ) of RUBISCO from algae, which ranges from 15 to 200 μM. Algae have adapted to low CO 2 conditions by developing ways to raise the CO 2 concentration for RUBISCO. The mechanism and distribution of these CO 2 concentrating mechanisms was the topic of the Fourth International Symposium of Inorganic Carbon Utilization by Aquatic Photosynthetic Organisms, better known as CCM 2001, held in Cairns, Australia from August 12 to 16, 2001. Dean Price, Murray Badger, David Yellowlees, and John Beardall organized this meeting. There were about 45 talks and about 20 poster presentations at the meeting. Distribution of ccms: “guilty until proved innocent” “Guilty until proved innocent” was the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Phycology Wiley

CARBON CONCENTRATING MECHANISMS IN AQUATIC PHOTOSYNTHETIC ORGANISMS: A REPORT ON CCM 2001

Journal of Phycology, Volume 37 (6) – Dec 1, 2001

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-3646
eISSN
1529-8817
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1529-8817.1999.37601-2.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Algae have evolved in a wide variety of environmental conditions including extremes in temperature, pH, and nutrient availability; however, one potential limitation most free‐living algae face at some time is low CO 2 conditions. Reasons for this limitation include the low affinity of ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RUBISCO) for CO 2 and the slow diffusion of CO 2 in aqueous environments. Even in environments relatively high in bicarbonate, such as seawater, the CO 2 concentration is only 10 μM. This value is lower than the measured K m (CO 2 ) of RUBISCO from algae, which ranges from 15 to 200 μM. Algae have adapted to low CO 2 conditions by developing ways to raise the CO 2 concentration for RUBISCO. The mechanism and distribution of these CO 2 concentrating mechanisms was the topic of the Fourth International Symposium of Inorganic Carbon Utilization by Aquatic Photosynthetic Organisms, better known as CCM 2001, held in Cairns, Australia from August 12 to 16, 2001. Dean Price, Murray Badger, David Yellowlees, and John Beardall organized this meeting. There were about 45 talks and about 20 poster presentations at the meeting. Distribution of ccms: “guilty until proved innocent” “Guilty until proved innocent” was the

Journal

Journal of PhycologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2001

References

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