CARAIB: A global model of terrestrial biological productivity

CARAIB: A global model of terrestrial biological productivity CARAIB, a mechanistic model of carbon assimilation in the biosphere estimates the net primary productivity (NPP) of the continental vegetation on a grid of 1° × 1° in latitude and longitude. The model considers the annual and diurnal cycles. It is based on the coupling of the three following submodels; a leaf assimilation model including estimates of stomatal conductance and leaf respiration, a canopy model describing principally the radiative transfer through the foliage, and a wood respiration model. Present‐day climate and vegetation characteristics allow the discrimination between ecotypes. In particular, specific information on vegetation distribution and properties is successfully used at four levels; the leaf physiological level, the plant level, the ecosystem level, and the global level. The productivity determined by the CARAIB model is compared with local measurements and empirical estimates showing a good agreement with a global value of 65 Gt C yr−1. The sensitivity of the model to the diurnal cycle and to the abundance of C4 species is also tested. The productivity slightly decreases (10%) when the diurnal cycle of the temperature is neglected. By contrast, neglecting the diurnal cycle of solar irradiance produces unrealistically high values of NPP. Even if the importance of this increase would presumably be reduced by the coupling of CARAIB with a nutrient cycle model, this test emphasizes the key role of the diurnal cycle in a mechanistic model of the NPP. Uncertainties on the abundance and spatial distribution of C4 plants may cause errors in the NPP estimates, however, as demonstrated by two sensitivity tests, these errors are certainly lower than 10% at the global scale as shown by two tests. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Biogeochemical Cycles Wiley

CARAIB: A global model of terrestrial biological productivity

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0886-6236
eISSN
1944-9224
D.O.I.
10.1029/94GB00850
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

CARAIB, a mechanistic model of carbon assimilation in the biosphere estimates the net primary productivity (NPP) of the continental vegetation on a grid of 1° × 1° in latitude and longitude. The model considers the annual and diurnal cycles. It is based on the coupling of the three following submodels; a leaf assimilation model including estimates of stomatal conductance and leaf respiration, a canopy model describing principally the radiative transfer through the foliage, and a wood respiration model. Present‐day climate and vegetation characteristics allow the discrimination between ecotypes. In particular, specific information on vegetation distribution and properties is successfully used at four levels; the leaf physiological level, the plant level, the ecosystem level, and the global level. The productivity determined by the CARAIB model is compared with local measurements and empirical estimates showing a good agreement with a global value of 65 Gt C yr−1. The sensitivity of the model to the diurnal cycle and to the abundance of C4 species is also tested. The productivity slightly decreases (10%) when the diurnal cycle of the temperature is neglected. By contrast, neglecting the diurnal cycle of solar irradiance produces unrealistically high values of NPP. Even if the importance of this increase would presumably be reduced by the coupling of CARAIB with a nutrient cycle model, this test emphasizes the key role of the diurnal cycle in a mechanistic model of the NPP. Uncertainties on the abundance and spatial distribution of C4 plants may cause errors in the NPP estimates, however, as demonstrated by two sensitivity tests, these errors are certainly lower than 10% at the global scale as shown by two tests.

Journal

Global Biogeochemical CyclesWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1994

References

  • Effect of model structure on the response of terrestrial biosphere models to CO 2 and temperature increases
    Harvey, Harvey
  • Interactions between carbon and nitrogen dynamics in estimating net primary productivity for potential vegetation in north America
    McGuire, McGuire; Melillo, Melillo; Joyce, Joyce; Kicklighter, Kicklighter; Grae, Grae; Moore, Moore; Vörösmarty, Vörösmarty

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