Cancer statistics for African Americans, 2013

Cancer statistics for African Americans, 2013 In this article, the American Cancer Society estimates the number of new cancer cases and deaths for African Americans and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, survival, and screening prevalence based upon incidence data from the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics. It is estimated that 176,620 new cases of cancer and 64,880 deaths will occur among African Americans in 2013. From 2000 to 2009, the overall cancer death rate among males declined faster among African Americans than whites (2.4% vs 1.7% per year), but among females, the rate of decline was similar (1.5% vs 1.4% per year, respectively). The decrease in cancer death rates among African American males was the largest of any racial or ethnic group. The reduction in overall cancer death rates since 1990 in men and 1991 in women translates to the avoidance of nearly 200,000 deaths from cancer among African Americans. Five‐year relative survival is lower for African Americans than whites for most cancers at each stage of diagnosis. The extent to which these disparities reflect unequal access to health care versus other factors remains an active area of research. Overall, progress in reducing cancer death rates has been made, although more can and should be done to accelerate this progress through ensuring equitable access to cancer prevention, early detection, and state‐of‐the‐art treatments. CA Cancer J Clin 2013. © 2013 American Cancer Society. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians Wiley

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/cancer-statistics-for-african-americans-2013-v5vt9dIfwn
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 American Cancer Society, Inc.
ISSN
0007-9235
eISSN
1542-4863
DOI
10.3322/caac.21173
pmid
23386565
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this article, the American Cancer Society estimates the number of new cancer cases and deaths for African Americans and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, survival, and screening prevalence based upon incidence data from the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics. It is estimated that 176,620 new cases of cancer and 64,880 deaths will occur among African Americans in 2013. From 2000 to 2009, the overall cancer death rate among males declined faster among African Americans than whites (2.4% vs 1.7% per year), but among females, the rate of decline was similar (1.5% vs 1.4% per year, respectively). The decrease in cancer death rates among African American males was the largest of any racial or ethnic group. The reduction in overall cancer death rates since 1990 in men and 1991 in women translates to the avoidance of nearly 200,000 deaths from cancer among African Americans. Five‐year relative survival is lower for African Americans than whites for most cancers at each stage of diagnosis. The extent to which these disparities reflect unequal access to health care versus other factors remains an active area of research. Overall, progress in reducing cancer death rates has been made, although more can and should be done to accelerate this progress through ensuring equitable access to cancer prevention, early detection, and state‐of‐the‐art treatments. CA Cancer J Clin 2013. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

Journal

CA: A Cancer Journal for CliniciansWiley

Published: May 1, 2013

References

  • A new method of estimating United States and state‐level cancer incidence counts for the current calendar year
    Pickle, Pickle; Hao, Hao; Jemal, Jemal
  • Gastric cancer epidemiology and risk factors
    Kelley, Kelley; Duggan, Duggan
  • Age‐specific trends in black‐white disparities in cervical cancer incidence in the United States: 1975‐2009
    Simard, Simard; Naishadham, Naishadham; Saslow, Saslow; Jemal, Jemal
  • Association of insurance with cancer care utilization and outcomes
    Ward, Ward; Halpern, Halpern; Schrag, Schrag
  • African‐American and Caucasian disparities in colorectal cancer mortality and survival by data source: an epidemiologic review
    Alexander, Alexander; Waterbor, Waterbor; Hughes, Hughes; Funkhouser, Funkhouser; Grizzle, Grizzle; Manne, Manne
  • Interactions among genes, tumor biology and the environment in cancer health disparities: examining the evidence on a national and global scale
    Wallace, Wallace; Martin, Martin; Ambs, Ambs
  • Health disparities in breast cancer: biology meets socioeconomic status
    Dunn, Dunn; Agurs‐Collins, Agurs‐Collins; Browne, Browne; Lubet, Lubet; Johnson, Johnson
  • Parity and disparity in first course treatment of invasive breast cancer
    Lund, Lund; Brawley, Brawley; Ward, Ward; Young, Young; Gabram, Gabram; Eley, Eley
  • Socioeconomic factors and breast cancer in black and white Americans
    Gordon, Gordon
  • Screening and prostate‐cancer mortality in a randomized European study
    Schroder, Schroder; Hugosson, Hugosson; Roobol, Roobol
  • Cancer screening‐United States, 2010
  • Timeliness of cervical cancer diagnosis and initiation of treatment in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program
    Benard, Benard; Howe, Howe; Royalty, Royalty; Helsel, Helsel; Kammerer, Kammerer; Richardson, Richardson
  • Widening socioeconomic disparities in cervical cancer mortality among women in 26 states, 1993‐2007
    Simard, Simard; Fedewa, Fedewa; Ma, Ma; Siegel, Siegel; Jemal, Jemal
  • Socioeconomic status and cervical cancer survival among older women: findings from the SEER‐Medicare linked data cohorts
    Coker, Coker; Du, Du; Fang, Fang; Eggleston, Eggleston

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off