Can We Teach Children To Think Creatively? *

Can We Teach Children To Think Creatively? * ... This article is based on a paper presented at the April 5, 1972, meeting of the American Educational Research Association in Chicago. Volume 6 Number 2 Second Quarter 1972 The Journal 0' Creative Behavior Journal had ever published a study on creative thinking, I was surprised though pleased, to find that Elkind, Deblinger, and Adler (1970) had documented what I had long assumed to be true. These investigators tested 32 children ranging from five to 12 years on three creativity measures. Each child was tested twice, once when taken from an ongoing "interesting" task and one when taken from an ongoing "uninteresting" task. When the children expected to return to an "uninteresting" task, they were almost twice as "creative" as they were when they anticipated the resumption of an "interesting" activity. In my teaching and research I had observed this phenomenon hundreds of times. I "knew" that it was true. To me, it was so obvious that it required no documentation. Still, I was pleased to see such documentation. I realize, too, that my deep involvement in creativity research and teaching may also make me unfit to evaluate the status of knowledge on teaching children to think http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Creative Behavior Wiley

Can We Teach Children To Think Creatively? *

The Journal of Creative Behavior, Volume 6 (2) – Jun 1, 1972

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1972 Creative Education Foundation
ISSN
0022-0175
eISSN
2162-6057
DOI
10.1002/j.2162-6057.1972.tb00923.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

... This article is based on a paper presented at the April 5, 1972, meeting of the American Educational Research Association in Chicago. Volume 6 Number 2 Second Quarter 1972 The Journal 0' Creative Behavior Journal had ever published a study on creative thinking, I was surprised though pleased, to find that Elkind, Deblinger, and Adler (1970) had documented what I had long assumed to be true. These investigators tested 32 children ranging from five to 12 years on three creativity measures. Each child was tested twice, once when taken from an ongoing "interesting" task and one when taken from an ongoing "uninteresting" task. When the children expected to return to an "uninteresting" task, they were almost twice as "creative" as they were when they anticipated the resumption of an "interesting" activity. In my teaching and research I had observed this phenomenon hundreds of times. I "knew" that it was true. To me, it was so obvious that it required no documentation. Still, I was pleased to see such documentation. I realize, too, that my deep involvement in creativity research and teaching may also make me unfit to evaluate the status of knowledge on teaching children to think

Journal

The Journal of Creative BehaviorWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1972

References

  • An investigation of the relationship between creativity and intelligence under two conditions of testing
    Boersma, Boersma; O'Bryan, O'Bryan
  • Developing creative thinking: the Purdue creativity program
    Feldhusen, Feldhusen; Treffinger, Treffinger; Bahlke, Bahlke
  • Teaching approach and the development of divergent thinking abilities in primary schools
    Haddon, Haddon; Lytton, Lytton
  • A self‐instructional program for developing productive thinking skills in fifth‐ and sixth‐grade children
    Olton, Olton
  • Developing problem‐solving ability in slow learning elementary students
    Sullivan, Sullivan
  • Achieving socialization without sacrificing creativity
    Torrance, Torrance
  • Developing creative problem solving abilities and related attitudes through programmed instruction
    Treffinger, Treffinger; Ripple, Ripple
  • Programmed instruction in creative problem solving
    Treffinger, Treffinger; Ripple, Ripple
  • Effects of administration and scoring of divergent thinking tests
    Vernon, Vernon
  • The development of productive thinking skills in fifth‐grade children
    Waldrop, Waldrop; Olton, Olton; Goodwin, Goodwin; Covington, Covington; Klausmeier, Klausmeier; Crutchfield, Crutchfield; Ronda, Ronda

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