Can Exercise Improve Cognitive Symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease?

Can Exercise Improve Cognitive Symptoms of Alzheimer's Disease? Approximately 5.3 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. The incidence of AD will more than double by 2050. AD‐related medical costs in the United States are estimated to exceed $1.1 trillion by 2050 unless effective methods to prevent and treat AD are identified.Exercise training is recommended as a cost‐effective lifestyle therapeutic option to improve brain health in older adults, with improvements in cognitive function mediated by positive neurophysiological changes. Consequently, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that older adults (aged ≥65) perform at least 150 minutes per week of moderate‐intensity aerobic exercise training (e.g., brisk walking), 75 minutes per week of vigorous‐intensity aerobic exercise training, or a combination of the two supplemented by muscle strengthening activities (e.g., dynamic resistance training) on 2 or more days per week. The WHO recommendations are based upon expert opinion regarding the use of exercise as prevention and treatment for AD because there are few meta‐analyses, and they have produced mixed results.One reason for the inconsistencies among these meta‐analyses may be a lack of adherence to the high‐quality contemporary methodological standards outlined in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta‐Analyses (PRISMA) statement http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American Geriatrics Society Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 American Geriatrics Society and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0002-8614
eISSN
1532-5415
D.O.I.
10.1111/jgs.15241
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Approximately 5.3 million Americans are living with Alzheimer's disease (AD), the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. The incidence of AD will more than double by 2050. AD‐related medical costs in the United States are estimated to exceed $1.1 trillion by 2050 unless effective methods to prevent and treat AD are identified.Exercise training is recommended as a cost‐effective lifestyle therapeutic option to improve brain health in older adults, with improvements in cognitive function mediated by positive neurophysiological changes. Consequently, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that older adults (aged ≥65) perform at least 150 minutes per week of moderate‐intensity aerobic exercise training (e.g., brisk walking), 75 minutes per week of vigorous‐intensity aerobic exercise training, or a combination of the two supplemented by muscle strengthening activities (e.g., dynamic resistance training) on 2 or more days per week. The WHO recommendations are based upon expert opinion regarding the use of exercise as prevention and treatment for AD because there are few meta‐analyses, and they have produced mixed results.One reason for the inconsistencies among these meta‐analyses may be a lack of adherence to the high‐quality contemporary methodological standards outlined in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta‐Analyses (PRISMA) statement

Journal

Journal of American Geriatrics SocietyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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