Butterfly spatial distribution and habitat requirements in a tropical forest: impacts of selective logging

Butterfly spatial distribution and habitat requirements in a tropical forest: impacts of... Summary 1. Spatial distribution, abundance and habitat requirements of Ragadia makuta (Satyrinae) were studied in Sabah (Borneo) in 1997, in unlogged forest and forest that had been selectively logged 8–9 years ago. 2. Measurement of vegetation structure showed that unlogged forest had significantly larger trees and greater canopy cover than logged forest. A principal components analysis extracted two factors related to forest density and tree size that were also significantly higher in unlogged forest. However, there was significant spatial heterogeneity in vegetation structure within logged forest. 3. In undisturbed forest, a logistic regression model identified suitable habitat for R. makuta as areas of less dense forest close to streams. There were no differences between logged and unlogged habitats in spatial distribution and abundance of R. makuta. Availability of suitable habitat and habitat requirements of butterflies also did not differ between habitats. There was, however, significant heterogeneity in butterfly abundance within logged forest, corresponding with availability of suitable habitat. 4. Fieldwork in 1997 coincided with a severe drought on Borneo, and butterfly spatial distribution and abundance were significantly reduced compared with a year of more normal rainfall (1996); populations in 1997 contracted to areas around streams and to areas with high cover of host‐plant. 5. Selectively logged areas can be highly heterogeneous in relation to levels of disturbance. Quantifying the effects of selective logging on forest structure and the availability of suitable habitat was crucial to understanding the responses of R. makuta to habitat disturbance. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Ecology Wiley

Butterfly spatial distribution and habitat requirements in a tropical forest: impacts of selective logging

Journal of Applied Ecology, Volume 36 (4) – Sep 1, 1999

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0021-8901
eISSN
1365-2664
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1365-2664.1999.00424.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary 1. Spatial distribution, abundance and habitat requirements of Ragadia makuta (Satyrinae) were studied in Sabah (Borneo) in 1997, in unlogged forest and forest that had been selectively logged 8–9 years ago. 2. Measurement of vegetation structure showed that unlogged forest had significantly larger trees and greater canopy cover than logged forest. A principal components analysis extracted two factors related to forest density and tree size that were also significantly higher in unlogged forest. However, there was significant spatial heterogeneity in vegetation structure within logged forest. 3. In undisturbed forest, a logistic regression model identified suitable habitat for R. makuta as areas of less dense forest close to streams. There were no differences between logged and unlogged habitats in spatial distribution and abundance of R. makuta. Availability of suitable habitat and habitat requirements of butterflies also did not differ between habitats. There was, however, significant heterogeneity in butterfly abundance within logged forest, corresponding with availability of suitable habitat. 4. Fieldwork in 1997 coincided with a severe drought on Borneo, and butterfly spatial distribution and abundance were significantly reduced compared with a year of more normal rainfall (1996); populations in 1997 contracted to areas around streams and to areas with high cover of host‐plant. 5. Selectively logged areas can be highly heterogeneous in relation to levels of disturbance. Quantifying the effects of selective logging on forest structure and the availability of suitable habitat was crucial to understanding the responses of R. makuta to habitat disturbance.

Journal

Journal of Applied EcologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1999

References

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