Bushmeat and the Fate of Trees with Seeds Dispersed by Large Primates in a Lowland Rain Forest in Western Amazonia

Bushmeat and the Fate of Trees with Seeds Dispersed by Large Primates in a Lowland Rain Forest in... ABSTRACT In Neotropical forests, large fruit‐eating primates play important ecological roles as dispersal agents of large seeds. Bushmeat hunting threatens to disrupt populations of primates and large‐seeded trees. We test the hypothesis that otherwise intact Neotropical forests with depressed populations of large primates experience decline in recruitment of large‐seeded trees. We quantify the proportion of small juveniles (> 0.5 m tall–1 cm diameter at breast height, DBH) of large primate‐dispersed tree species found underneath heterospecifc trees that are also dispersed by large primates at two protected sites in Manu National Park and one hunted site outside Manu N.P. in southeastern Peru. The forests are comparable in edaphic and climatic qualities, successional stage, and adult tree species composition. We found that hunting locally exterminates populations of large primates, and reduced primates of intermediate body size (hereafter “medium primates”) by 80 percent. Moreover, tree species richness was 55 percent lower and density of species dispersed by large and medium‐bodied primates 60 percent lower in hunted than in protected sites. In addition, richness and density of abiotically dispersed species and plants dispersed by non‐game animals are greater in hunted sites. Overhunting threatens to disrupt the ecological interactions between primates and the plants that rely on them for seed dispersal and recruitment. Sustainable wildlife management plans are urgently needed, because protected areas are at risk of becoming “island” parks if buffer zones become empty of animals and have impoverished flora. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biotropica Wiley

Bushmeat and the Fate of Trees with Seeds Dispersed by Large Primates in a Lowland Rain Forest in Western Amazonia

Biotropica, Volume 39 (3) – May 1, 2007

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/bushmeat-and-the-fate-of-trees-with-seeds-dispersed-by-large-primates-5RKUYWHdns
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2007 The Author(s) Journal compilation © 2007 by The Association for Tropical Biology and Conservation
ISSN
0006-3606
eISSN
1744-7429
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1744-7429.2007.00276.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT In Neotropical forests, large fruit‐eating primates play important ecological roles as dispersal agents of large seeds. Bushmeat hunting threatens to disrupt populations of primates and large‐seeded trees. We test the hypothesis that otherwise intact Neotropical forests with depressed populations of large primates experience decline in recruitment of large‐seeded trees. We quantify the proportion of small juveniles (> 0.5 m tall–1 cm diameter at breast height, DBH) of large primate‐dispersed tree species found underneath heterospecifc trees that are also dispersed by large primates at two protected sites in Manu National Park and one hunted site outside Manu N.P. in southeastern Peru. The forests are comparable in edaphic and climatic qualities, successional stage, and adult tree species composition. We found that hunting locally exterminates populations of large primates, and reduced primates of intermediate body size (hereafter “medium primates”) by 80 percent. Moreover, tree species richness was 55 percent lower and density of species dispersed by large and medium‐bodied primates 60 percent lower in hunted than in protected sites. In addition, richness and density of abiotically dispersed species and plants dispersed by non‐game animals are greater in hunted sites. Overhunting threatens to disrupt the ecological interactions between primates and the plants that rely on them for seed dispersal and recruitment. Sustainable wildlife management plans are urgently needed, because protected areas are at risk of becoming “island” parks if buffer zones become empty of animals and have impoverished flora.

Journal

BiotropicaWiley

Published: May 1, 2007

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off