British and Indian scientists in Boston considering returning to their home countries

British and Indian scientists in Boston considering returning to their home countries This paper argues that despite a sizeable literature on return migration, it is still not well understood whether highly skilled migrants are remaining in their host countries or returning to their home countries. I argue that most British and Indian scientists working in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sector around Boston are likely to remain in the US. This provides a different perspective to many recent studies which have highlighted the temporary nature of highly skilled migration. I argue that permanent types of migration need to be placed in the context of other temporary forms of migration. Similarly to microeconomic theories of migration, I argue that professional opportunities are the principal reason why highly skilled migrants would return to their home countries. However, culture and lifestyle, family considerations, and to a lesser extent governments, are also significant in shaping migration decisions. This paper shows that there are important differences in the intentions of highly skilled migrants from developed and developing countries to return to their home countries. I argue that migrants often face conflicting loyalties in different countries, and their individual social networks with actors in their host and home countries will help them make migration decisions. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population, Space and Place Wiley

British and Indian scientists in Boston considering returning to their home countries

Population, Space and Place, Volume 15 (6) – Nov 1, 2009

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1544-8444
eISSN
1544-8452
DOI
10.1002/psp.526
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper argues that despite a sizeable literature on return migration, it is still not well understood whether highly skilled migrants are remaining in their host countries or returning to their home countries. I argue that most British and Indian scientists working in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sector around Boston are likely to remain in the US. This provides a different perspective to many recent studies which have highlighted the temporary nature of highly skilled migration. I argue that permanent types of migration need to be placed in the context of other temporary forms of migration. Similarly to microeconomic theories of migration, I argue that professional opportunities are the principal reason why highly skilled migrants would return to their home countries. However, culture and lifestyle, family considerations, and to a lesser extent governments, are also significant in shaping migration decisions. This paper shows that there are important differences in the intentions of highly skilled migrants from developed and developing countries to return to their home countries. I argue that migrants often face conflicting loyalties in different countries, and their individual social networks with actors in their host and home countries will help them make migration decisions. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Population, Space and PlaceWiley

Published: Nov 1, 2009

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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