Brain astrocytes express region‐specific surface glycoproteins in culture

Brain astrocytes express region‐specific surface glycoproteins in culture Astrocytes derived from the mouse brain mesencephalon and striatum regulate neuronal morphogenesis in a region‐specific manner in vitro. To begin defining molecular mechanisms that may underlie this functional heterogeneity, lectin probes were used to compare surface glycoproteins expressed by astrocytes from different brain regions. These experiments demonstrated marked differences in surface glycoproteins depending on the anatomic origin of the astrocytes. In particular, mesencephalic and cerebellar astrocytes express a fucosylated glycoprotein with and apparent molecular weight of 190 kD that is absent or rarely expressed by striatal or cortical astrocytes. These findings raise the possibility that carbohydrate diversity of astrocyte surface molecules may play a role in the heterogeneity of region‐specific neuron‐glial interactions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Glia Wiley

Brain astrocytes express region‐specific surface glycoproteins in culture

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 Alan R. Liss, Inc.
ISSN
0894-1491
eISSN
1098-1136
D.O.I.
10.1002/glia.440010111
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Astrocytes derived from the mouse brain mesencephalon and striatum regulate neuronal morphogenesis in a region‐specific manner in vitro. To begin defining molecular mechanisms that may underlie this functional heterogeneity, lectin probes were used to compare surface glycoproteins expressed by astrocytes from different brain regions. These experiments demonstrated marked differences in surface glycoproteins depending on the anatomic origin of the astrocytes. In particular, mesencephalic and cerebellar astrocytes express a fucosylated glycoprotein with and apparent molecular weight of 190 kD that is absent or rarely expressed by striatal or cortical astrocytes. These findings raise the possibility that carbohydrate diversity of astrocyte surface molecules may play a role in the heterogeneity of region‐specific neuron‐glial interactions.

Journal

GliaWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1988

References

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    Chneiweiss, Chneiweiss; Glowinski, Glowinski; Prémont, Prémont
  • Modulation by monoamines of somatostatin‐sensitive adenylate cyclase on neuronal and glial cells from the mouse brain in primary cultures
    Chneiweiss, Chneiweiss; Glowinski, Glowinski; Prémont, Prémont
  • Site restricted expression of cytotactin during development of the chicken embryo
    Crossin, Crossin; Hoffman, Hoffman; Grumet, Grumet; Thiery, Thiery; Edelman, Edelman
  • How do the migratory and adhesive properties of the neural crest govern ganglia formation in the avian peripheral nervous system?
    Duband, Duband; Tucker, Tucker; Poole, Poole; Vincent, Vincent; Aoyama, Aoyama; Thiery, Thiery
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    Liesi, Liesi; Dahl, Dahl; Vaheri, Vaheri
  • Biosynthesis of the D2‐cell adhesion molecule: Pulse‐chase studies in cultured fetal rat neuronal cells
    Lyles, Lyles; Norrild, Norrild; Bock, Bock
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    Manthorpe, Manthorpe; Engvall, Engvall; Ruoslahti, Ruoslahti; Longo, Longo; Davis, Davis; Varon, Varon
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    Reeber, Reeber; Vincendon, Vincendon; Zanetta, Zanetta

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