Bounded rationality and satisficing in young people's Web‐based decision making

Bounded rationality and satisficing in young people's Web‐based decision making This study investigated Simon's behavioral decision‐making theories of bounded rationality and satisficing in relation to young people's decision making in the World Wide Web, and considered the role of personal preferences in Web‐based decisions. It employed a qualitative research methodology involving group interviews with 22 adolescent females. Data analysis took the form of iterative pattern coding using QSR NUD*IST Vivo qualitative data analysis software. Data analysis revealed that the study participants did operate within the limits of bounded rationality. These limits took the form of time constraints, information overload, and physical constraints. Data analysis also uncovered two major satisficing behaviors—reduction and termination. Personal preference was found to play a major role in Web site evaluation in the areas of graphic/multimedia and subject content preferences. This study has related implications for Web site designers and for adult intermediaries who work with young people and the Web. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology Wiley

Bounded rationality and satisficing in young people's Web‐based decision making

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2002 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
2330-1635
eISSN
2330-1643
DOI
10.1002/asi.10024
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study investigated Simon's behavioral decision‐making theories of bounded rationality and satisficing in relation to young people's decision making in the World Wide Web, and considered the role of personal preferences in Web‐based decisions. It employed a qualitative research methodology involving group interviews with 22 adolescent females. Data analysis took the form of iterative pattern coding using QSR NUD*IST Vivo qualitative data analysis software. Data analysis revealed that the study participants did operate within the limits of bounded rationality. These limits took the form of time constraints, information overload, and physical constraints. Data analysis also uncovered two major satisficing behaviors—reduction and termination. Personal preference was found to play a major role in Web site evaluation in the areas of graphic/multimedia and subject content preferences. This study has related implications for Web site designers and for adult intermediaries who work with young people and the Web.

Journal

Journal of the Association for Information Science and TechnologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2002

References

  • A principle of uncertainty for information seeking
    Kuhlthau, C.C.

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