Bisphenol A affects glucose transport in mouse 3T3‐F442A adipocytes

Bisphenol A affects glucose transport in mouse 3T3‐F442A adipocytes Recently, environmental chemicals have appeared in daily human life, and these chemicals have been incidentally taken in by humans. The serum concentrations of some of these chemicals have been found to be associated with the onset and incidence rate of diabetes mellitus. It has been suggested that one of the environmental chemicals, bisphenol A (BPA), has hormone‐like activity. It has also been demonstrated that some hormones affect insulin resistance and fat distribution in the body. To study the effects of these environmental chemicals on glucose metabolism, the effect of BPA on glucose transport in mouse 3T3‐F442A adipocytes was investigated. The 3T3‐F442A adipocytes were incubated with various concentrations of BPA in a medium. Deoxyglucose uptake assay was performed with and without insulin. Immunoblot analysis was performed with a glucose transporter (GLUT) 4‐specific antibody and antiphosphotyrosine antibody. The BPA treatment enhanced basal and insulin‐stimulated glucose uptake, and caused an increased amount of GLUT4 protein. Thus, the enhanced glucose uptake resulting from the BPA treatment was at least partially due to the increased amount of GLUT4. Tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate‐1 with insulin stimulation was not significantly affected. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that BPA, one of the chemicals that we intake incidentally, affects the glucose transport in adipocytes, and also that the environmental chemicals may be identified as one of the environmental factors that affect diabetes and obesity. British Journal of Pharmacology (2004) 141, 209–214. doi:10.1038/sj.bjp.0705520 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Pharmacology Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2004 British Pharmacological Society
ISSN
0007-1188
eISSN
1476-5381
DOI
10.1038/sj.bjp.0705520
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recently, environmental chemicals have appeared in daily human life, and these chemicals have been incidentally taken in by humans. The serum concentrations of some of these chemicals have been found to be associated with the onset and incidence rate of diabetes mellitus. It has been suggested that one of the environmental chemicals, bisphenol A (BPA), has hormone‐like activity. It has also been demonstrated that some hormones affect insulin resistance and fat distribution in the body. To study the effects of these environmental chemicals on glucose metabolism, the effect of BPA on glucose transport in mouse 3T3‐F442A adipocytes was investigated. The 3T3‐F442A adipocytes were incubated with various concentrations of BPA in a medium. Deoxyglucose uptake assay was performed with and without insulin. Immunoblot analysis was performed with a glucose transporter (GLUT) 4‐specific antibody and antiphosphotyrosine antibody. The BPA treatment enhanced basal and insulin‐stimulated glucose uptake, and caused an increased amount of GLUT4 protein. Thus, the enhanced glucose uptake resulting from the BPA treatment was at least partially due to the increased amount of GLUT4. Tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate‐1 with insulin stimulation was not significantly affected. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that BPA, one of the chemicals that we intake incidentally, affects the glucose transport in adipocytes, and also that the environmental chemicals may be identified as one of the environmental factors that affect diabetes and obesity. British Journal of Pharmacology (2004) 141, 209–214. doi:10.1038/sj.bjp.0705520

Journal

British Journal of PharmacologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2004

References

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