Biology of the human malignant lymphomas I. Establishment in continuous cell culture and heterotransplantation of diffuse histiocytic lymphomas

Biology of the human malignant lymphomas I. Establishment in continuous cell culture and... With the aid of a new methodology of tissue culture which permits rapid screening of nutrient requirements, the tumor cells from pleural or peritoneal effusions of three patients with diffuse histiocytic lymphomas have been established in continuous culture in vitro and designated as the SU‐DHL‐I, SU‐DHL‐2, and SU‐DHL‐3 cell lines, respectively. All three cell lines required a 10% supplement of human pleural effusion fluid or human serum for continuous growth. Morphologically, they closely resembled the tumor cells of the original patients as seen in lymph node biopsies or in pleural or peritoneal effusion fluids. Histochemical studies revealed positive reactions for nonspecific esterase, acid phosphatase, and methyl green‐pyronin in both the original tumor cells and the histiocytic lymphoma cell lines. Cytoplasmic vacuoles, which were particularly conspicuous in the‐SU‐DHL‐I cells, were shown to contain lipid. In contrast, a lymphoblastoid cell line, SU‐LB‐I, was negative for nonspecific esterase, acid phosphatase, and lipid. The histiocytic lymphoma cell lines were more rigorously distinguishable from lymphoblastoid cell lines by their negative EBNA test reactions for the presence of the Epstein‐Barr virus (EBV) genome and by their lack of surface immunoglobulin staining reactions characteristic of B‐lymphocytes. Cytogenetic studies demonstrated that early culture passages of the histiocytic lymphoma cell lines were aneuploid. These cells were also successfully heterotransplanted in the brains of congenitally athymic (“nude”) mice, providing further evidence of their neoplastic character. These histiocytic lymphoma cell lines provide an important new resource for studies of this group of highly malignant human lymphomas. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Cancer Wiley

Biology of the human malignant lymphomas I. Establishment in continuous cell culture and heterotransplantation of diffuse histiocytic lymphomas

Cancer, Volume 34 (6) – Dec 1, 1974

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1974 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0008-543X
eISSN
1097-0142
DOI
10.1002/1097-0142(197412)34:6<1851::AID-CNCR2820340602>3.0.CO;2-4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

With the aid of a new methodology of tissue culture which permits rapid screening of nutrient requirements, the tumor cells from pleural or peritoneal effusions of three patients with diffuse histiocytic lymphomas have been established in continuous culture in vitro and designated as the SU‐DHL‐I, SU‐DHL‐2, and SU‐DHL‐3 cell lines, respectively. All three cell lines required a 10% supplement of human pleural effusion fluid or human serum for continuous growth. Morphologically, they closely resembled the tumor cells of the original patients as seen in lymph node biopsies or in pleural or peritoneal effusion fluids. Histochemical studies revealed positive reactions for nonspecific esterase, acid phosphatase, and methyl green‐pyronin in both the original tumor cells and the histiocytic lymphoma cell lines. Cytoplasmic vacuoles, which were particularly conspicuous in the‐SU‐DHL‐I cells, were shown to contain lipid. In contrast, a lymphoblastoid cell line, SU‐LB‐I, was negative for nonspecific esterase, acid phosphatase, and lipid. The histiocytic lymphoma cell lines were more rigorously distinguishable from lymphoblastoid cell lines by their negative EBNA test reactions for the presence of the Epstein‐Barr virus (EBV) genome and by their lack of surface immunoglobulin staining reactions characteristic of B‐lymphocytes. Cytogenetic studies demonstrated that early culture passages of the histiocytic lymphoma cell lines were aneuploid. These cells were also successfully heterotransplanted in the brains of congenitally athymic (“nude”) mice, providing further evidence of their neoplastic character. These histiocytic lymphoma cell lines provide an important new resource for studies of this group of highly malignant human lymphomas.

Journal

CancerWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1974

References

  • Tissue culture studies on pleural effusions from breast carcinoma patients
    Cailleau, R.; MacKay, B.; Young, R. K.; Reeves, W. J.
  • Methods for determining neoplastic properties
    Foley, G. E.
  • Continuous culture of human lymphoblasts from peripheral blood of a child with acute leukemia
    Foley, G. E.; Lazarus, H.; Farber, S.; Uzman, B. G.; Boone, B. A.; McCarthy, R. E.
  • Development of invasive tumors in the “nude” mouse after injection of cultured human melanoma cells
    Giovanella, B. C.; Yim, S. O.; Stehlin, J. S.; Williams, L. J.
  • Immunofluorescence, interference and complement fixation techniques in the detection of the herpes type virus in Burkitt tumor cell lines
    Henle, G.; Henle, W.
  • Childhood lymphoblastic lymphoma, a cancer of thymus‐derived lymphocytes
    Kaplan, J.; Mastrangelo, R.; Peterson, W. D.
  • Chromosome abnormalities in the malignant lymphomas
    Millard, R. E.
  • Cultured human lymphocytes
    Moore, G. E.
  • Oncogenesis and Herpesviruses
    Nilsson, K.; Klein, G.; Henle, G.; Henle, W.; de‐Thé, G.
  • Transformation of foetal human leukocytes in vitro by filtrates of a human leukemic cell line containing herpes‐like virus
    Pope, J. H.; Horne, M. K.; Scott, W.

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