Biologically induced systemic acquired resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana

Biologically induced systemic acquired resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana Summary Local infection with a necrotizing pathogen can render plants resistant to subsequent infection by normally virulent pathogens. A system for biological induction of such systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in Arabidopsis thaliana is reported. When plants were immunized by local inoculation of a single leaf with avirulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) carrying the avrRpt2 avirulence gene, after 2 days other leaves became resistant, as measured symptomatically and by in planta bacterial growth, to challenge with a virulent Pst strain lacking this avirulence gene. Resistance was systemic and protected the plants against infection by other virulent pathogens including P. syringae pv. maculicola. Low‐dose inoculation induced a strong SAR and double immunizations did not increase the level of protection indicating that the response of only a few cells to the immunizing bacteria is required. SAR was not induced by the virulent strain of Pst lacking avrRpt2. However, experiments with the Arabidopsis RPS2 disease resistance gene mutant rps2‐201, which does not exhibit a local hypersensitive response to Pst carrying the corresponding avirulence gene avrRpt2, indicate that a hypersensitive response contributes to, but is not essential for, the induction of SAR. Thus, avrRpt2 activates either a branching signal pathway or separate parallel pathways for induction of localized hypersensitive resistance and SAR, with downstream potentiation of the systemic response by the local response. Using this system for the biological induction of SAR in Arabidopsis, it should be possible to dissect the molecular genetics of SAR by the isolation of mutants affected in the production, transmission, perception and transduction of the systemic signal(s). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Plant Journal Wiley

Biologically induced systemic acquired resistance in Arabidopsis thaliana

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/biologically-induced-systemic-acquired-resistance-in-arabidopsis-ZsVclKZKOk
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0960-7412
eISSN
1365-313X
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1365-313X.1994.00715.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary Local infection with a necrotizing pathogen can render plants resistant to subsequent infection by normally virulent pathogens. A system for biological induction of such systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in Arabidopsis thaliana is reported. When plants were immunized by local inoculation of a single leaf with avirulent Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) carrying the avrRpt2 avirulence gene, after 2 days other leaves became resistant, as measured symptomatically and by in planta bacterial growth, to challenge with a virulent Pst strain lacking this avirulence gene. Resistance was systemic and protected the plants against infection by other virulent pathogens including P. syringae pv. maculicola. Low‐dose inoculation induced a strong SAR and double immunizations did not increase the level of protection indicating that the response of only a few cells to the immunizing bacteria is required. SAR was not induced by the virulent strain of Pst lacking avrRpt2. However, experiments with the Arabidopsis RPS2 disease resistance gene mutant rps2‐201, which does not exhibit a local hypersensitive response to Pst carrying the corresponding avirulence gene avrRpt2, indicate that a hypersensitive response contributes to, but is not essential for, the induction of SAR. Thus, avrRpt2 activates either a branching signal pathway or separate parallel pathways for induction of localized hypersensitive resistance and SAR, with downstream potentiation of the systemic response by the local response. Using this system for the biological induction of SAR in Arabidopsis, it should be possible to dissect the molecular genetics of SAR by the isolation of mutants affected in the production, transmission, perception and transduction of the systemic signal(s).

Journal

The Plant JournalWiley

Published: May 1, 1994

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off