Biological denitrification of drinking water using autotrophic organisms with H 2 in a fluidized‐bed biofilm reactor

Biological denitrification of drinking water using autotrophic organisms with H 2 in a... 10.1002/bit.260290414.abs Biological denitrification of drinking water was studied in a fluidized sand bed reactor using a mixed culture. Hydrogen gas was used as the reaction partner. The reaction kinetics were calculated with a double Monod saturation function. The Ks value for hydrogen was below 0.1% of saturation. No appreciable biofilm diffusion effects were detected. Reactor performance was a function of the culture's past history. Batch experiments always exhibited an accumulation of NO2−, but continuous experiments with a sufficiently long residence time always resulted in complete nitrogen removal. Rates of up to 23 mg N/L h, 25 mg N/g DW h, and 7.9 mg H2/L h were achieved. Residence times of 4.5 h would be required for complete denitrification of water containing 25 mg NO3−–N/L or approximately 1 h for every 5 mg/L. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biotechnology and Bioengineering Wiley

Biological denitrification of drinking water using autotrophic organisms with H 2 in a fluidized‐bed biofilm reactor

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
ISSN
0006-3592
eISSN
1097-0290
D.O.I.
10.1002/bit.260290414
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

10.1002/bit.260290414.abs Biological denitrification of drinking water was studied in a fluidized sand bed reactor using a mixed culture. Hydrogen gas was used as the reaction partner. The reaction kinetics were calculated with a double Monod saturation function. The Ks value for hydrogen was below 0.1% of saturation. No appreciable biofilm diffusion effects were detected. Reactor performance was a function of the culture's past history. Batch experiments always exhibited an accumulation of NO2−, but continuous experiments with a sufficiently long residence time always resulted in complete nitrogen removal. Rates of up to 23 mg N/L h, 25 mg N/g DW h, and 7.9 mg H2/L h were achieved. Residence times of 4.5 h would be required for complete denitrification of water containing 25 mg NO3−–N/L or approximately 1 h for every 5 mg/L.

Journal

Biotechnology and BioengineeringWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1987

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