Biodiversity analysis of microbial community in the chem‐bioflocculation treatment process

Biodiversity analysis of microbial community in the chem‐bioflocculation treatment process Total DNA was directly extracted from environmental samples and amplified with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The PCR products were fingerprinted via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Significant differences were observed in the microbial community structures between traditional treatment process and chem‐bioflocculation process. The microbial community structure shift at different sampling locations in chem‐bioflocculation process and on two typical operational conditions was studied. 16S rDNA V3 regions of some dominant species were sequenced and the species were identified. The microbial communities were stable in both the chem‐bioflocculation process and the activated sludge process under various experimental conditions presented in this work. The attached growth treatment process was less stable when operational conditions changed. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Biotechnology and Bioengineering Wiley

Biodiversity analysis of microbial community in the chem‐bioflocculation treatment process

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0006-3592
eISSN
1097-0290
D.O.I.
10.1002/bit.20339
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Total DNA was directly extracted from environmental samples and amplified with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The PCR products were fingerprinted via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Significant differences were observed in the microbial community structures between traditional treatment process and chem‐bioflocculation process. The microbial community structure shift at different sampling locations in chem‐bioflocculation process and on two typical operational conditions was studied. 16S rDNA V3 regions of some dominant species were sequenced and the species were identified. The microbial communities were stable in both the chem‐bioflocculation process and the activated sludge process under various experimental conditions presented in this work. The attached growth treatment process was less stable when operational conditions changed. © 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

Journal

Biotechnology and BioengineeringWiley

Published: Mar 20, 2005

Keywords: PCR; DGGE; microbial community structures; activated sludge

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