Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Biochemical genetics and fishery management: an historical perspective

Biochemical genetics and fishery management: an historical perspective This paper traces the development of applications of biochemical genetic methods to problems of fishery management over a period of four decades. In the 1950s, details of presumed genetic structuring offish species appeared destined for revelation through Mendelian characters identified by immunogenetic procedures. In the 1960s, immunogenetic methods were displaced by protein electrophoresis, with a proliferation of reports of genotypic and allelic data for protein‐coding loci. In the 1970s, disagreement about the biological significance of protein polymorphisms delayed acceptance of management applications of this variation. In the 1980s, management applications included identification of relationships among populations, analyses of mixed stock fisheries, and uses in fish culture, conservation biology and forensics. The complementary relationship between protein electrophoresis and nucleic acid technologies is stressed, with a plea to recognize the unique attributes of properly applied protein electrophoresis in fishery management. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Fish Biology Wiley

Biochemical genetics and fishery management: an historical perspective

Journal of Fish Biology , Volume 39 – Dec 1, 1991

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/biochemical-genetics-and-fishery-management-an-historical-perspective-X5CEBEkrWF
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-1112
eISSN
1095-8649
DOI
10.1111/j.1095-8649.1991.tb05063.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper traces the development of applications of biochemical genetic methods to problems of fishery management over a period of four decades. In the 1950s, details of presumed genetic structuring offish species appeared destined for revelation through Mendelian characters identified by immunogenetic procedures. In the 1960s, immunogenetic methods were displaced by protein electrophoresis, with a proliferation of reports of genotypic and allelic data for protein‐coding loci. In the 1970s, disagreement about the biological significance of protein polymorphisms delayed acceptance of management applications of this variation. In the 1980s, management applications included identification of relationships among populations, analyses of mixed stock fisheries, and uses in fish culture, conservation biology and forensics. The complementary relationship between protein electrophoresis and nucleic acid technologies is stressed, with a plea to recognize the unique attributes of properly applied protein electrophoresis in fishery management.

Journal

Journal of Fish BiologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1991

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month