Beyond frequency: Habit as mental construct

Beyond frequency: Habit as mental construct Progress in habit theory can be made by distinguishing habit from frequency of occurrence, and using independent measures for these constructs. This proposition was investigated in three studies using a longitudinal, cross‐sectional and experimental design on eating, mental habits and word processing, respectively. In Study 1, snacking habit and past snacking frequency independently predicted later snacking behaviour, while controlling for the theory of planned behaviour variables. Habit fully mediated the effect of past on later behaviour. In Study 2, habitual negative self‐thinking and past frequency of negative self‐thoughts independently predicted self‐esteem and the presence of depressive and anxiety symptoms. In Study 3, habit varied as a function of experimentally manipulated task complexity, while behavioural frequency was held constant. Taken together, while repetition is necessary for habits to develop, these studies demonstrate that habit should not be equated with frequency of occurrence, but rather should be considered as a mental construct involving features of automaticity, such as lack of awareness, difficulty to control and mental efficiency. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Social Psychology Wiley

Beyond frequency: Habit as mental construct

British Journal of Social Psychology, Volume 45 (3) – Sep 1, 2006

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/beyond-frequency-habit-as-mental-construct-52Zrt6vWdD
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 2006 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
0144-6665
eISSN
2044-8309
DOI
10.1348/014466605X49122
pmid
16984725
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Progress in habit theory can be made by distinguishing habit from frequency of occurrence, and using independent measures for these constructs. This proposition was investigated in three studies using a longitudinal, cross‐sectional and experimental design on eating, mental habits and word processing, respectively. In Study 1, snacking habit and past snacking frequency independently predicted later snacking behaviour, while controlling for the theory of planned behaviour variables. Habit fully mediated the effect of past on later behaviour. In Study 2, habitual negative self‐thinking and past frequency of negative self‐thoughts independently predicted self‐esteem and the presence of depressive and anxiety symptoms. In Study 3, habit varied as a function of experimentally manipulated task complexity, while behavioural frequency was held constant. Taken together, while repetition is necessary for habits to develop, these studies demonstrate that habit should not be equated with frequency of occurrence, but rather should be considered as a mental construct involving features of automaticity, such as lack of awareness, difficulty to control and mental efficiency.

Journal

British Journal of Social PsychologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2006

References

  • Pro‐environmental habits: Propensity levels in behavioural change
    Dahlstrand, U.; Biel, A.
  • The handbook of social psychology
    Kenny, D. A.; Kashy, D. A.; Bolger, N.
  • An analysis of intentions to recycle household waste: The roles of past behaviour, perceived habit, and perceived lack of facilities
    Knussen, C.; Yule, F.; MacKenzie, J.; Wells, M.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off