Being Alone, Playing Alone, and Acting Alone: Distinguishing among Reticence and Passive and Active Solitude in Young Children

Being Alone, Playing Alone, and Acting Alone: Distinguishing among Reticence and Passive and... 3 forms of solitude were studied in young children—reticence (onlooker and unoccupied behavior), solitary‐passive behavior (solitary‐constructive and ‐exploratory play), and solitary‐active behavior (solitary‐functional and ‐dramatic play). 48 4‐year‐old children grouped in quartets of same‐sex unfamiliar peers were observed in several situations. Mothers completed the Colorado Temperament Inventory. Results indicated that (1) solitary‐passive, solitary‐active, and reticent behaviors were nonsignificantly intercorrelated; (2) reticence was stable and associated with the demonstration of anxiety and hovering near others, whereas solitary‐passive and solitary‐active play were stable yet unrelated to anxiety and hovering; (3) reticence during free play was generally associated with poor performance and displays of wariness in several other social situations, while solitary‐passive and ‐active play were not; (4) reticence was associated with maternal ratings of child shyness, while solitary‐active behavior was associated with maternal ratings of impulsivity. Results are discussed in terms of the underlying mechanisms associated with reticence and passive and active withdrawal. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Child Development Wiley

Being Alone, Playing Alone, and Acting Alone: Distinguishing among Reticence and Passive and Active Solitude in Young Children

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/being-alone-playing-alone-and-acting-alone-distinguishing-among-rTBm1OnplR
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0009-3920
eISSN
1467-8624
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1467-8624.1994.tb00739.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

3 forms of solitude were studied in young children—reticence (onlooker and unoccupied behavior), solitary‐passive behavior (solitary‐constructive and ‐exploratory play), and solitary‐active behavior (solitary‐functional and ‐dramatic play). 48 4‐year‐old children grouped in quartets of same‐sex unfamiliar peers were observed in several situations. Mothers completed the Colorado Temperament Inventory. Results indicated that (1) solitary‐passive, solitary‐active, and reticent behaviors were nonsignificantly intercorrelated; (2) reticence was stable and associated with the demonstration of anxiety and hovering near others, whereas solitary‐passive and solitary‐active play were stable yet unrelated to anxiety and hovering; (3) reticence during free play was generally associated with poor performance and displays of wariness in several other social situations, while solitary‐passive and ‐active play were not; (4) reticence was associated with maternal ratings of child shyness, while solitary‐active behavior was associated with maternal ratings of impulsivity. Results are discussed in terms of the underlying mechanisms associated with reticence and passive and active withdrawal.

Journal

Child DevelopmentWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1994

References

  • Development of inhibited children's coping with unfamiliarity
    Asendorpf, Asendorpf
  • The relations among infant temperament, security of attachment, and behavioral inhibition at twenty‐four months
    Calkins, Calkins; Fox, Fox

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off