Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Behavioural characteristics and gene expression in the hyperactive wiggling (Wig) rat

Behavioural characteristics and gene expression in the hyperactive wiggling (Wig) rat Recently, congenic wiggling (Wig) rats were described as a good model for attention‐deficit hyperactivity disorder; 12‐ to 14‐week‐old animals demonstrated hyperactivity, impulsive behaviour and an impaired working memory. Here, we show that 4‐ to 5‐week‐old Wig rats displayed significantly greater spontaneous motor activity than control rats during a period of darkness. Subcutaneous injection of 4 mg/kg methamphetamine exacerbated hyperactivity, the reverse of its effect in rats with neonatally induced 6‐hydroxydopamine lesions. Immunohistochemistry showed low levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in the ventral midbrain, similar to 6‐hydroxydopamine‐treated rats. In cDNA macroarrays, 4‐week‐old Wig rats showed increased expression of the adenosine A2a receptor in the dorsal striatum, macrophage migration inhibitory factor in the frontal cortex, ventral striatum and midbrain, and calbindin 2 in the dorsal and ventral midbrain. Expression of the γ‐aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter and sterol carrier protein 2 genes was reduced in all regions. Dopamine transporter gene expression was increased in the dorsal midbrain but decreased in the ventral midbrain, a pattern distinct from that induced by 6‐hydroxydopamine. Although abnormal development of dopaminergic neurons may underlie motor hyperactivity, other mechanisms may control responsiveness to methamphetamine. Wig rats may provide a model of attention‐deficit hyperactivity disorder in which treatment with psychostimulants accelerate the hyperactivity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Neuroscience Wiley

Behavioural characteristics and gene expression in the hyperactive wiggling (Wig) rat

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/behavioural-characteristics-and-gene-expression-in-the-hyperactive-WlBla1nMIP
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0953-816X
eISSN
1460-9568
DOI
10.1111/j.1460-9568.2007.05613.x
pmid
17610585
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recently, congenic wiggling (Wig) rats were described as a good model for attention‐deficit hyperactivity disorder; 12‐ to 14‐week‐old animals demonstrated hyperactivity, impulsive behaviour and an impaired working memory. Here, we show that 4‐ to 5‐week‐old Wig rats displayed significantly greater spontaneous motor activity than control rats during a period of darkness. Subcutaneous injection of 4 mg/kg methamphetamine exacerbated hyperactivity, the reverse of its effect in rats with neonatally induced 6‐hydroxydopamine lesions. Immunohistochemistry showed low levels of tyrosine hydroxylase in the ventral midbrain, similar to 6‐hydroxydopamine‐treated rats. In cDNA macroarrays, 4‐week‐old Wig rats showed increased expression of the adenosine A2a receptor in the dorsal striatum, macrophage migration inhibitory factor in the frontal cortex, ventral striatum and midbrain, and calbindin 2 in the dorsal and ventral midbrain. Expression of the γ‐aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter and sterol carrier protein 2 genes was reduced in all regions. Dopamine transporter gene expression was increased in the dorsal midbrain but decreased in the ventral midbrain, a pattern distinct from that induced by 6‐hydroxydopamine. Although abnormal development of dopaminergic neurons may underlie motor hyperactivity, other mechanisms may control responsiveness to methamphetamine. Wig rats may provide a model of attention‐deficit hyperactivity disorder in which treatment with psychostimulants accelerate the hyperactivity.

Journal

European Journal of NeuroscienceWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2007

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month