Behavioral and psychophysiological correlates of self‐presentation in temperamentally shy children

Behavioral and psychophysiological correlates of self‐presentation in temperamentally shy children We examined temporal changes in behavior, regional brain electrical activity (EEG), heart rate, cardiac vagal tone, the startle eyeblink response, and salivary cortisol during a task designed to elicit self‐presentation anxiety in a group of 7‐year‐olds, some of whom were classified as temperamentally shy. We found that temperamentally shy children displayed a significantly greater increase in anxious behavior, a greater increase in right, but not left, frontal EEG activity, and a greater increase in heart rate as the task became more demanding compared with their nonshy counterparts. However, the results failed to reveal any significant group differences on the startle eyeblink and salivary cortisol measures. The present findings extend our prior work, in which we found distinct patterns of psychophysiological activity on baseline measures, to differences on psychophysiological measures collected concurrently during a socially evaluative situation in temperamentally shy children. © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 35: 119–135, 1999 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Psychobiology Wiley

Behavioral and psychophysiological correlates of self‐presentation in temperamentally shy children

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
ISSN
0012-1630
eISSN
1098-2302
D.O.I.
10.1002/(SICI)1098-2302(199909)35:2<119::AID-DEV5>3.0.CO;2-G
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We examined temporal changes in behavior, regional brain electrical activity (EEG), heart rate, cardiac vagal tone, the startle eyeblink response, and salivary cortisol during a task designed to elicit self‐presentation anxiety in a group of 7‐year‐olds, some of whom were classified as temperamentally shy. We found that temperamentally shy children displayed a significantly greater increase in anxious behavior, a greater increase in right, but not left, frontal EEG activity, and a greater increase in heart rate as the task became more demanding compared with their nonshy counterparts. However, the results failed to reveal any significant group differences on the startle eyeblink and salivary cortisol measures. The present findings extend our prior work, in which we found distinct patterns of psychophysiological activity on baseline measures, to differences on psychophysiological measures collected concurrently during a socially evaluative situation in temperamentally shy children. © 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 35: 119–135, 1999

Journal

Developmental PsychobiologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1999

References

  • Affective neuroscience: The emergence of a discipline
    Davidson, Davidson; Sutton, Sutton
  • Fear‐potentiated startle responses in temperamentally different human infants
    Schmidt, Schmidt; Fox, Fox
  • Behavioral and neuroendocrine responses in shy children
    Schmidt, Schmidt; Fox, Fox; Rubin, Rubin; Sternberg, Sternberg; Gold, Gold; Smith, Smith; Schulkin, Schulkin

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