Basic and clinical science posters: Early detection and prevention

Basic and clinical science posters: Early detection and prevention P77Sleep traits predict incident Type 2 diabetes independently of QDiabetes risk factors in UK Biobank participantsAD PREMDAYAL1, SG Anderson2, HS Dashti3, J Bowden4,5, C Vetter6,7, SD Kyle8, DA Bechtold1,9, R Saxena3, DA Lawlor4,5, MK Rutter1,91Medical School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK, 2Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK, 3Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA, 4Medical Research Council Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Bristol, UK, 5Population Health Science, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK, 6Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, USA, 7Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, USA, 8Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK, 9Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Gastroenterology, University of Manchester, Manchester, UKAim: To determine whether sleep traits (sleep duration or insomnia defined as difficulty initiating and/or maintaining sleep) predict incident Type 2 diabetes, independently of QDiabetes risk factors.Methods: Sleep traits were assessed from responses to a questionnaire, in ˜450,000 UK Biobank participants without diabetes at baseline. Incident Type 2 diabetes cases were assessed from secondary care hospital records. Cox‐regression determined the six‐year risk of incident Type 2 diabetes associated with sleep traits, before and after adjusting for QDiabetes risk factors – age, sex, ethnicity, deprivation, smoking, family history, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, steroid therapy and body mass index.Results: A strong u‐shaped relationship was observed between sleep duration and risk for incident Type 2 diabetes (n = 6,574 cases), and this relationship remained after adjusting for QDiabetes factors. For example, compared with participants reporting sleeping 7h/night, those reporting sleeping 4h per night had an adjusted hazard ratio (HR (95% CI)) of 1.6 (1.4 to 2.0) and those reporting sleeping 10h per night had an adjusted HR of 1.8 (1.5 to 2.0). Compared with participants who did not report insomnia, those who ‘sometimes’ experienced insomnia had an adjusted HR of 1.1 (1.1 to 1.2) and those who ‘usually’ had insomnia had an adjusted HR of 1.4 (1.3 to 1.5).Conclusion: Sleep traits, as assessed by a simple questionnaire that could be easily used in clinical practice, was independently associated with higher risk for incident Type 2 diabetes, suggesting that questions about sleep may be useful to improve the clinical prediction of diabetes and lead to better‐targeted lifestyle interventions in high‐risk individuals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Diabetic Medicine Wiley

Basic and clinical science posters: Early detection and prevention

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Diabetic Medicine © 2018 Diabetes UK
ISSN
0742-3071
eISSN
1464-5491
D.O.I.
10.1111/dme.9_13571
Publisher site
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Abstract

P77Sleep traits predict incident Type 2 diabetes independently of QDiabetes risk factors in UK Biobank participantsAD PREMDAYAL1, SG Anderson2, HS Dashti3, J Bowden4,5, C Vetter6,7, SD Kyle8, DA Bechtold1,9, R Saxena3, DA Lawlor4,5, MK Rutter1,91Medical School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK, 2Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK, 3Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA, 4Medical Research Council Integrative Epidemiology Unit at the University of Bristol, Bristol, UK, 5Population Health Science, Bristol Medical School, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK, 6Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, USA, 7Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, USA, 8Sleep and Circadian Neuroscience Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK, 9Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Gastroenterology, University of Manchester, Manchester, UKAim: To determine whether sleep traits (sleep duration or insomnia defined as difficulty initiating and/or maintaining sleep) predict incident Type 2 diabetes, independently of QDiabetes risk factors.Methods: Sleep traits were assessed from responses to a questionnaire, in ˜450,000 UK Biobank participants without diabetes at baseline. Incident Type 2 diabetes cases were assessed from secondary care hospital records. Cox‐regression determined the six‐year risk of incident Type 2 diabetes associated with sleep traits, before and after adjusting for QDiabetes risk factors – age, sex, ethnicity, deprivation, smoking, family history, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, steroid therapy and body mass index.Results: A strong u‐shaped relationship was observed between sleep duration and risk for incident Type 2 diabetes (n = 6,574 cases), and this relationship remained after adjusting for QDiabetes factors. For example, compared with participants reporting sleeping 7h/night, those reporting sleeping 4h per night had an adjusted hazard ratio (HR (95% CI)) of 1.6 (1.4 to 2.0) and those reporting sleeping 10h per night had an adjusted HR of 1.8 (1.5 to 2.0). Compared with participants who did not report insomnia, those who ‘sometimes’ experienced insomnia had an adjusted HR of 1.1 (1.1 to 1.2) and those who ‘usually’ had insomnia had an adjusted HR of 1.4 (1.3 to 1.5).Conclusion: Sleep traits, as assessed by a simple questionnaire that could be easily used in clinical practice, was independently associated with higher risk for incident Type 2 diabetes, suggesting that questions about sleep may be useful to improve the clinical prediction of diabetes and lead to better‐targeted lifestyle interventions in high‐risk individuals.

Journal

Diabetic MedicineWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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