Basic and clinical science posters: Actions, metabolism and therapy

Basic and clinical science posters: Actions, metabolism and therapy P1The impact of ethnicity on the association between insulin sensitivity and adiposity measures in Black African and White European men with normal glucose tolerance and Type 2 diabetesO BELLO, M Ladwa, CS Marathe, C Mohandas, SA Amiel, LM GoffDiabetes & Nutritional Sciences, King's College London, London, UKAim: Black populations exhibit pronounced insulin resistance and disproportionately high rates of Type 2 diabetes. In Black women, Type 2 diabetes risk is driven by excess adiposity, but this association is less clear in men. We investigated the associations between insulin sensitivity and adiposity measures in normal glucose tolerant (NGT) and early (<5 years) Type 2 diabetes men of Black African (BA) and White European (WE) ethnicity.Methods: Insulin sensitivity was measured using the 40mU/m2 hyperinsulinaemic‐euglycaemic clamp in 34 BA (NGT = 16, Type 2 diabetes = 18) and 34 WE (14 = NGT, 20 = Type 2 diabetes) men through measurement of whole‐body glucose disposal/corrected glucose infusion rate (M). Waist circumference and body mass index (BMI) were correlated against M using Pearson's correlation to determine ethnic‐specific associations.Results: There was a non‐significant trend towards lower insulin sensitivity in NGT BA (BA 322.82 ± 82.51; WE 380.12 ±93.77 mg/m2 BSA/min, p = 0.09) and no ethnic differences in insulin sensitivity in Type 2 diabetes (BA 191.02 ± 85.34; WE 154.54 ± 81.77 mg/m2 BSA/min p = 0.19). Insulin sensitivity correlated significantly with BMI (R2 = 0.43, p = 0.006) and waist circumference (R2 = 0.50, p = 0.002) in NGT BA but not significantly in NGT WE (BMI; R2 = 0.003, p = 0.85, waist circumference; R2 = 0.18, p = 0.13). In Type 2 diabetes, insulin sensitivity correlated significantly with BMI (R2 = 0.32, p = 0.009) and waist circumference (R2 = 0.47, p = 0.001) in WE but much less strongly in BA (BMI; R2 = 0.16, p = 0.10, waist circumference; R2 = 0.21, p = 0.06).Conclusion: This preliminary analysis suggests that associations between insulin sensitivity and adiposity are stronger in Black African men, although the difference is lost in early Type 2 diabetes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Diabetic Medicine Wiley

Basic and clinical science posters: Actions, metabolism and therapy

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Diabetic Medicine © 2018 Diabetes UK
ISSN
0742-3071
eISSN
1464-5491
D.O.I.
10.1111/dme.13571
Publisher site
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Abstract

P1The impact of ethnicity on the association between insulin sensitivity and adiposity measures in Black African and White European men with normal glucose tolerance and Type 2 diabetesO BELLO, M Ladwa, CS Marathe, C Mohandas, SA Amiel, LM GoffDiabetes & Nutritional Sciences, King's College London, London, UKAim: Black populations exhibit pronounced insulin resistance and disproportionately high rates of Type 2 diabetes. In Black women, Type 2 diabetes risk is driven by excess adiposity, but this association is less clear in men. We investigated the associations between insulin sensitivity and adiposity measures in normal glucose tolerant (NGT) and early (<5 years) Type 2 diabetes men of Black African (BA) and White European (WE) ethnicity.Methods: Insulin sensitivity was measured using the 40mU/m2 hyperinsulinaemic‐euglycaemic clamp in 34 BA (NGT = 16, Type 2 diabetes = 18) and 34 WE (14 = NGT, 20 = Type 2 diabetes) men through measurement of whole‐body glucose disposal/corrected glucose infusion rate (M). Waist circumference and body mass index (BMI) were correlated against M using Pearson's correlation to determine ethnic‐specific associations.Results: There was a non‐significant trend towards lower insulin sensitivity in NGT BA (BA 322.82 ± 82.51; WE 380.12 ±93.77 mg/m2 BSA/min, p = 0.09) and no ethnic differences in insulin sensitivity in Type 2 diabetes (BA 191.02 ± 85.34; WE 154.54 ± 81.77 mg/m2 BSA/min p = 0.19). Insulin sensitivity correlated significantly with BMI (R2 = 0.43, p = 0.006) and waist circumference (R2 = 0.50, p = 0.002) in NGT BA but not significantly in NGT WE (BMI; R2 = 0.003, p = 0.85, waist circumference; R2 = 0.18, p = 0.13). In Type 2 diabetes, insulin sensitivity correlated significantly with BMI (R2 = 0.32, p = 0.009) and waist circumference (R2 = 0.47, p = 0.001) in WE but much less strongly in BA (BMI; R2 = 0.16, p = 0.10, waist circumference; R2 = 0.21, p = 0.06).Conclusion: This preliminary analysis suggests that associations between insulin sensitivity and adiposity are stronger in Black African men, although the difference is lost in early Type 2 diabetes.

Journal

Diabetic MedicineWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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