Basement membrane component changes in skeletal muscle transplants undergoing regeneration or rejection

Basement membrane component changes in skeletal muscle transplants undergoing regeneration or... 10.1002/jcb.240270404.abs The basement membrane of myofibers plays an important role during orderly regeneration of skeletal muscle after injury. In this report, changes in various basement membrane components were analyzed in skeletal muscle grafts undergoing regeneration (autografts) or immune rejection (allografts). The immunofluorescence technique using specific antibodies against laminin, types IV and V collagen, heparan sulfate proteoglycan, fibronectin, in combination with binding of concanavalin A (ConA) was used to monitor basement membranes. In normal muscle, these components were localized in the pericellular region of myofiber corresponding to its basement membrane, After transplantation, the majority of myofibers underwent degeneration as a result of is chemic injury, followed by regeneration from precursor myosatellite cells. Various components of basement membrane zone disappeared from the degenerating myofibers, leaving behind some unidentifiable component that still bound ConA. A new basement membrane appeared around the regenerated myotubes which persisted during maturation of the regenerating muscle, In rejected skeletal muscles, the immunoreactivity of various components persisted even after the disappearance of myotubes and myofiber cytoplasm. In addition, an accumulation of fibronectin was seen throughout the rejected muscle with the onset of immune rejection. These results demonstrate that the major basement membrane components disappear and reappear sequentially during myofiber degeneration and regeneration. Such a turnover is not seen in rejected skeletal muscles. Thus, the myofiber basement membrane is not a static structure as previously thought but one which changes chemically during degeneration and regeneration. This feature of basement membrane may be important in the orderly regeneration of skeletal muscle after injury. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Wiley

Basement membrane component changes in skeletal muscle transplants undergoing regeneration or rejection

Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, Volume 27 (4) – Jan 1, 1985

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 Alan R. Liss, Inc.
ISSN
0730-2312
eISSN
1097-4644
DOI
10.1002/jcb.240270404
pmid
3997979
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

10.1002/jcb.240270404.abs The basement membrane of myofibers plays an important role during orderly regeneration of skeletal muscle after injury. In this report, changes in various basement membrane components were analyzed in skeletal muscle grafts undergoing regeneration (autografts) or immune rejection (allografts). The immunofluorescence technique using specific antibodies against laminin, types IV and V collagen, heparan sulfate proteoglycan, fibronectin, in combination with binding of concanavalin A (ConA) was used to monitor basement membranes. In normal muscle, these components were localized in the pericellular region of myofiber corresponding to its basement membrane, After transplantation, the majority of myofibers underwent degeneration as a result of is chemic injury, followed by regeneration from precursor myosatellite cells. Various components of basement membrane zone disappeared from the degenerating myofibers, leaving behind some unidentifiable component that still bound ConA. A new basement membrane appeared around the regenerated myotubes which persisted during maturation of the regenerating muscle, In rejected skeletal muscles, the immunoreactivity of various components persisted even after the disappearance of myotubes and myofiber cytoplasm. In addition, an accumulation of fibronectin was seen throughout the rejected muscle with the onset of immune rejection. These results demonstrate that the major basement membrane components disappear and reappear sequentially during myofiber degeneration and regeneration. Such a turnover is not seen in rejected skeletal muscles. Thus, the myofiber basement membrane is not a static structure as previously thought but one which changes chemically during degeneration and regeneration. This feature of basement membrane may be important in the orderly regeneration of skeletal muscle after injury.

Journal

Journal of Cellular BiochemistryWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1985

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