Bacterial metabolism and health‐related effects of galacto‐oligosaccharides and other prebiotics

Bacterial metabolism and health‐related effects of galacto‐oligosaccharides and other prebiotics Summary Most studies involving prebiotic oligosaccharides have been carried out using inulin and its fructo‐oligosaccharide (FOS) derivatives, together with various forms of galacto‐oligosaccharides (GOS). Although many intestinal bacteria are able to grow on these carbohydrates, most investigations have demonstrated that the growth of bifidobacteria, and to a lesser degree lactobacilli, is particularly favoured. Because of their safety, stability, organoleptic properties, resistance to digestion in the upper bowel and fermentability in the colon, as well as their abilities to promote the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut, these prebiotics are being increasingly incorporated into the Western diet. Inulin‐derived oligosaccharides and GOS are mildly laxative, but can result in flatulence and osmotic diarrhoea if taken in large amounts. However, their effects on large bowel habit are relatively minor. Although the literature dealing with the health significance of prebiotics is not as extensive as that concerning probiotics, considerable evidence has accrued showing that consumption of GOS and FOS can have significant health benefits, particularly in relation to their putative anti‐cancer properties, influence on mineral absorption, lipid metabolism, and anti‐inflammatory and other immune effects such as atopic disease. In many instances, prebiotics seem to be more effective when used as part of a synbiotic combination. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Microbiology Wiley

Bacterial metabolism and health‐related effects of galacto‐oligosaccharides and other prebiotics

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/bacterial-metabolism-and-health-related-effects-of-galacto-DBvxdyAz4P
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1364-5072
eISSN
1365-2672
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2672.2007.03520.x
pmid
18215222
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Summary Most studies involving prebiotic oligosaccharides have been carried out using inulin and its fructo‐oligosaccharide (FOS) derivatives, together with various forms of galacto‐oligosaccharides (GOS). Although many intestinal bacteria are able to grow on these carbohydrates, most investigations have demonstrated that the growth of bifidobacteria, and to a lesser degree lactobacilli, is particularly favoured. Because of their safety, stability, organoleptic properties, resistance to digestion in the upper bowel and fermentability in the colon, as well as their abilities to promote the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut, these prebiotics are being increasingly incorporated into the Western diet. Inulin‐derived oligosaccharides and GOS are mildly laxative, but can result in flatulence and osmotic diarrhoea if taken in large amounts. However, their effects on large bowel habit are relatively minor. Although the literature dealing with the health significance of prebiotics is not as extensive as that concerning probiotics, considerable evidence has accrued showing that consumption of GOS and FOS can have significant health benefits, particularly in relation to their putative anti‐cancer properties, influence on mineral absorption, lipid metabolism, and anti‐inflammatory and other immune effects such as atopic disease. In many instances, prebiotics seem to be more effective when used as part of a synbiotic combination.

Journal

Journal of Applied MicrobiologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2008

References

  • Increased resistance of mice to Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection by synbiotic administration of bifidobacteria and transgalactosylated oligosaccharides
    Asahara, Asahara; Nomoto, Nomoto; Shimizu, Shimizu; Watanuki, Watanuki; Tanaka, Tanaka
  • Faecal sIgA secretion in infants fed on pre‐ or probiotic infant formula
    Bakker‐Zierikzee, Bakker‐Zierikzee; Van Tol, Van Tol; Kroes, Kroes; Alles, Alles; Kok, Kok; Bindels, Bindels
  • Prescript‐assist probiotic‐prebiotic treatment for irritable bowel syndrome: a methodologically oriented, 2‐week, randomized, placebo‐controlled, double blind clinical study
    Bittner, Bittner; Croffut, Croffut; Stranahan, Stranahan
  • n‐Butyrate downregulates the stimulatory function of peripheral blood‐derived antigen‐presenting cells: a potential mechanism for modulating T‐cell responses by short‐chain fatty acids
    Bohmig, Bohmig; Krieger, Krieger; Saemann, Saemann; Wenhardt, Wenhardt; Pohanka, Pohanka; Zlabinger, Zlabinger
  • Availabilities of calcium, iron and zinc from dairy infant formulas is affected by soluble dietary fibers and modified starch fractions
    Bosscher, Bosscher; Van Caillie‐Bertrand, Van Caillie‐Bertrand; Deelstra, Deelstra
  • Synthesis of galactooligosaccharides and transgalactosylation modelling in reverse micelles
    Chen, Chen; Ou‐Yang, Ou‐Yang; Yeh, Yeh
  • Intestinal permeability is increased in burn patients shortly after injury
    Deitch, Deitch
  • Antitumorigenic activity of the prebiotic inulin enriched with oligofructose in combination with the probiotics Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Bifidobacterium lactis on azoxymethane‐induced colon carcinogenesis in rats
    Femia, Femia; Luceri, Luceri; Dolara, Dolara; Giannini, Giannini; Biggeri, Biggeri; Salvadori, Salvadori; Clune, Clune; Collins, Collins
  • Dietary oligofructose lowers triglycerides, phospholipids and cholesterol in serum and very low density lipoproteins of rats
    Fiordaliso, Fiordaliso; Kok, Kok; Desager, Desager; Goethals, Goethals; Deboyser, Deboyser; Roberfroid, Roberfroid; Delzenne, Delzenne
  • Utilisation of galacto‐oligosaccharides as selective substrates for growth by lactic acid bacteria including Bifidobacterium lactis DR10 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus DR20
    Gopal, Gopal; Sullivan, Sullivan; Smart, Smart
  • Comparison of mucosal adhesion and species identification of bifidobacteria isolated from healthy and allergic infants
    He, He; Ouwehand, Ouwehand; Isolauri, Isolauri; Hashimoto, Hashimoto; Benno, Benno; Salminen, Salminen
  • Modelling the growth and bacteriocin production production by Lactobacillus amylovorus DCE 471 in batch cultivation
    Lejeune, Lejeune; Callewaert, Callewaert; Crabbe, Crabbe; De Vuyst, De Vuyst
  • Failure of dietary oligofructose to prevent antibiotic‐associated diarrhoea
    Lewis, Lewis; Burmeister, Burmeister; Cohen, Cohen; Brazier, Brazier; Awathi, Awathi
  • Prebiotics in the gastrointestinal tract
    Macfarlane, Macfarlane; Macfarlane, Macfarlane; Cummings, Cummings
  • Dietary fructooligosaccharides up‐regulate immunoglobulin A response and polymeric immunoglobulin receptor expression in intestines of infant mice
    Nakamura, Nakamura; Nosaka, Nosaka; Suzuki, Suzuki; Nagafuchi, Nagafuchi; Takahashi, Takahashi; Yajima, Yajima; Takenouchi‐Ohkubo, Takenouchi‐Ohkubo; Iwase, Iwase
  • Clinical evaluation of a new starter formula for infants containing live Bifidobacterium longum BL999 and prebiotics
    Puccio, Puccio; Caiozzo, Caiozzo; Meli, Meli; Rochat, Rochat; Grathwohl, Grathwohl; Steenhout, Steenhout
  • Effect of dietary oligofructose and inulin on colonic preneoplastic aberrant crypt foci inhibition
    Reddy, Reddy; Hamid, Hamid; Rao, Rao
  • Effect of Bifidobacterium longum and inulin on gut bacterial metabolism and carcinogen induced aberrant crypt foci in rats
    Rowland, Rowland; Rumney, Rumney; Coutts, Coutts; Lievense, Lievense
  • Short chain fatty acids and human colonic function: roles of resistant starch and nonstarch polysaccharides
    Topping, Topping; Clifton, Clifton
  • A specific prebiotic oligosaccharide mixture stimulates delayed‐type hypersensitivity in a murine influenza vaccination model
    Vos, Vos; Haarman, Haarman; Buco, Buco; Govers, Govers; Knol, Knol; Garssen, Garssen; Stahl, Stahl; Boehm, Boehm
  • Effect of dietary galacto‐oligosaccharides on azoxymethane‐induced aberrant crypt foci and colorectal cancer in Fischer 344 rats
    Wijnands, Wijnands; Schoterman, Schoterman; Bruijntjes, Bruijntjes; Hollanders, Hollanders; Woutersen, Woutersen

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off