B cell and T cell immunity in the female genital tract: Potential of distinct mucosal routes of vaccination and role of tissue‐associated dendritic cells and natural killer cells

B cell and T cell immunity in the female genital tract: Potential of distinct mucosal routes of... Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18 (Suppl. 5): 117–122 The female genital mucosa constitutes the major port of entry of sexually transmitted infections. Most genital microbial pathogens represent an enormous challenge for developing vaccines that can induce genital immunity that will prevent their transmission. It is now established that long‐lasting protective immunity at mucosal surfaces has to involve local B‐cell and T‐cell effectors as well as local memory cells. Mucosal immunization constitutes an attractive way to generate systemic and genital B‐cell and T‐cell immune responses that can control early infection by sexually transmitted pathogens. Nevertheless, no mucosal vaccines against sexually transmitted infections are approved for human use. The mucosa‐associated immune system is highly compartmentalized and the selection of any particular route or combinations of routes of immunization is critical when defining vaccine strategies against genital infections. Furthermore, mucosal surfaces are complex immunocompetent tissues that comprise antigen‐presenting cells and also innate immune effectors and non‐immune cells that can act as ‘natural adjuvants’ or negative immune modulators. The functions of these cells have to be taken into account when designing tissue‐specific antigen‐delivery systems and adjuvants. Here, we will discuss data that compare different mucosal routes of immunization to generate B‐cell and T‐cell responses in the genital tract, with a special emphasis on the newly described sublingual route of immunization. We will also summarize data on the understanding of the effector and induction mechanisms of genital immunity that may influence the development of vaccine strategies against genital infections. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Microbiology and Infection Wiley

B cell and T cell immunity in the female genital tract: Potential of distinct mucosal routes of vaccination and role of tissue‐associated dendritic cells and natural killer cells

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2012 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2012 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
ISSN
1198-743X
eISSN
1469-0691
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1469-0691.2012.03995.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18 (Suppl. 5): 117–122 The female genital mucosa constitutes the major port of entry of sexually transmitted infections. Most genital microbial pathogens represent an enormous challenge for developing vaccines that can induce genital immunity that will prevent their transmission. It is now established that long‐lasting protective immunity at mucosal surfaces has to involve local B‐cell and T‐cell effectors as well as local memory cells. Mucosal immunization constitutes an attractive way to generate systemic and genital B‐cell and T‐cell immune responses that can control early infection by sexually transmitted pathogens. Nevertheless, no mucosal vaccines against sexually transmitted infections are approved for human use. The mucosa‐associated immune system is highly compartmentalized and the selection of any particular route or combinations of routes of immunization is critical when defining vaccine strategies against genital infections. Furthermore, mucosal surfaces are complex immunocompetent tissues that comprise antigen‐presenting cells and also innate immune effectors and non‐immune cells that can act as ‘natural adjuvants’ or negative immune modulators. The functions of these cells have to be taken into account when designing tissue‐specific antigen‐delivery systems and adjuvants. Here, we will discuss data that compare different mucosal routes of immunization to generate B‐cell and T‐cell responses in the genital tract, with a special emphasis on the newly described sublingual route of immunization. We will also summarize data on the understanding of the effector and induction mechanisms of genital immunity that may influence the development of vaccine strategies against genital infections.

Journal

Clinical Microbiology and InfectionWiley

Published: Oct 1, 2012

References

  • Mucosal immunity and vaccines
    Holmgren, Holmgren; Czerkinsky, Czerkinsky
  • Long‐lived cytotoxic T lymphocyte memory in mucosal tissues after mucosal but not systemic immunization
    Gallichan, Gallichan; Rosenthal, Rosenthal
  • Skin infection generates non‐migratory memory CD8 + T(rm) cells providing global skin immunity
    Jiang, Jiang; Clark, Clark; Liu, Liu; Wagers, Wagers; Fuhlbrigge, Fuhlbrigge; Kupper, Kupper
  • Defending the mucosa: adjuvant and carrier formulations for mucosal immunity
    Lawson, Lawson; Norton, Norton; Clements, Clements
  • Differential roles of migratory and resident DCs in T cell priming after mucosal or skin HSV‐1 infection
    Lee, Lee; Zamora, Zamora; Linehan, Linehan
  • Functional specialization of gut CD103 + dendritic cells in the regulation of tissue‐selective T cell homing
    Johansson‐Lindbom, Johansson‐Lindbom; Svensson, Svensson; Pabst, Pabst
  • Natural killer cells: detectors of stress
    Luci, Luci; Tomasello, Tomasello
  • Natural killer cells act as rheostats modulating antiviral T cells
    Waggoner, Waggoner; Cornberg, Cornberg; Selin, Selin; Welsh, Welsh
  • Innate immunity defines the capacity of antiviral T cells to limit persistent infection
    Andrews, Andrews; Estcourt, Estcourt; Andoniou, Andoniou
  • A human natural killer cell subset provides an innate source of IL‐22 for mucosal immunity
    Cella, Cella; Fuchs, Fuchs; Vermi, Vermi

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