Avoid rejecting livers from donation after circulatory death donors based on donor age alone

Avoid rejecting livers from donation after circulatory death donors based on donor age alone AbbreviationsCITcold ischemia timeDBDdonation after brain deathDCDdonation after circulatory deathDWITdonor warm ischemia timeLTliver transplantationMELDModel for End‐Stage Liver DiseaseDespite improved donation after circulatory death (DCD) liver transplantation (LT) outcomes in the United States over the last 15 years, they represent only 6% of the total. There are multiple factors that contribute to this low number. These include the following:Inferior graft survival compared with donation after brain death (DBD) donors.Increased incidence of posttransplant cholangiopathy resulting in significant morbidity and need for retransplantation.However, judicious selection of DCD grafts results in outcomes comparable with DBD grafts.Factors potentially impacting DCD outcomes include donor age, donor body mass index, recipient age, Model for End‐Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, donor warm ischemia time (DWIT), functional DWIT, cold ischemia time (CIT), and retransplantation. Shorter ischemia times, lower recipient MELD scores, and younger recipient age positively impact DCD outcomes. The use of allografts from DCD donors <50 years with short CIT resulted in better outcomes compared with that seen with DBD donor livers with age ≥60 years in 1 report. Although most agree that the use of younger DCD donor livers are more likely to yield more favorable outcomes, the upper donor age limit for DCD liver acceptance remains http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Liver Transplantation Wiley

Avoid rejecting livers from donation after circulatory death donors based on donor age alone

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/avoid-rejecting-livers-from-donation-after-circulatory-death-donors-5CtSsRMtcz
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.
ISSN
1527-6465
eISSN
1527-6473
D.O.I.
10.1002/lt.25018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsCITcold ischemia timeDBDdonation after brain deathDCDdonation after circulatory deathDWITdonor warm ischemia timeLTliver transplantationMELDModel for End‐Stage Liver DiseaseDespite improved donation after circulatory death (DCD) liver transplantation (LT) outcomes in the United States over the last 15 years, they represent only 6% of the total. There are multiple factors that contribute to this low number. These include the following:Inferior graft survival compared with donation after brain death (DBD) donors.Increased incidence of posttransplant cholangiopathy resulting in significant morbidity and need for retransplantation.However, judicious selection of DCD grafts results in outcomes comparable with DBD grafts.Factors potentially impacting DCD outcomes include donor age, donor body mass index, recipient age, Model for End‐Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, donor warm ischemia time (DWIT), functional DWIT, cold ischemia time (CIT), and retransplantation. Shorter ischemia times, lower recipient MELD scores, and younger recipient age positively impact DCD outcomes. The use of allografts from DCD donors <50 years with short CIT resulted in better outcomes compared with that seen with DBD donor livers with age ≥60 years in 1 report. Although most agree that the use of younger DCD donor livers are more likely to yield more favorable outcomes, the upper donor age limit for DCD liver acceptance remains

Journal

Liver TransplantationWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off