Authors’ reply to the comment by Kendall et al.

Authors’ reply to the comment by Kendall et al. We would like to thank for the opportunity to reply to the important questions raised by Kendall et al. and also would like to thank the authors of that letter for their kind words (Kendall and Castro‐Alves, ).Our results indeed seem contrary to previous results about opioid‐induced hyperalgesia (OIH), but on a detailed look, there is not necessarily a contradiction. Until now, no direct link between the short‐lasting OIH and long‐term pain has been shown in humans. Although OIH may increase acute pain intensity and thus indirectly induce pain chronification, efficacious postoperative analgesia may as well be sufficient to prevent long‐lasting changes.In our study, we applied patient‐controlled analgesia infusion pumps, which seem to have effectively prevented an influence of OIH on the individual acute pain levels as our data show no significant correlation between intraoperative remifentanil consumption and the pain level at one hour after surgery (Spearman correlation coefficient rho = 0.145, p = 0.139) even though we find a strong and significant correlation between intraoperative remifentanil consumption and patient‐controlled piritramide consumption in the first hour after surgery (Spearman correlation coefficient rho = 0.350, p < 0.001), most parsimoniously explained by OIH. Our interpretation of these results is that the analgesia protocol in the early postoperative phase was http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png European Journal of Pain Wiley

Authors’ reply to the comment by Kendall et al.

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 European Pain Federation ‐ EFIC®
ISSN
1090-3801
eISSN
1532-2149
D.O.I.
10.1002/ejp.1208
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We would like to thank for the opportunity to reply to the important questions raised by Kendall et al. and also would like to thank the authors of that letter for their kind words (Kendall and Castro‐Alves, ).Our results indeed seem contrary to previous results about opioid‐induced hyperalgesia (OIH), but on a detailed look, there is not necessarily a contradiction. Until now, no direct link between the short‐lasting OIH and long‐term pain has been shown in humans. Although OIH may increase acute pain intensity and thus indirectly induce pain chronification, efficacious postoperative analgesia may as well be sufficient to prevent long‐lasting changes.In our study, we applied patient‐controlled analgesia infusion pumps, which seem to have effectively prevented an influence of OIH on the individual acute pain levels as our data show no significant correlation between intraoperative remifentanil consumption and the pain level at one hour after surgery (Spearman correlation coefficient rho = 0.145, p = 0.139) even though we find a strong and significant correlation between intraoperative remifentanil consumption and patient‐controlled piritramide consumption in the first hour after surgery (Spearman correlation coefficient rho = 0.350, p < 0.001), most parsimoniously explained by OIH. Our interpretation of these results is that the analgesia protocol in the early postoperative phase was

Journal

European Journal of PainWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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