Aural haematoma in Guinea pig (Cavia porcellus)

Aural haematoma in Guinea pig (Cavia porcellus) Aural haematoma occurs when blood accumulates under the skin of the pinna. It is usually caused by head shaking or ear scratching, often associated with an ear infection. It is well reported in dogs, cats and rabbits (Fossum , Capello , Csomos et al. ), but it is rare in rodents (Jepson ). In fact, to our knowledge, this clinical case is the first report in a Guinea pig (Fig. A). The treatment of choice, as described in previous species, consists of surgical drainage (Fossum , Capello , Csomos et al. ), and it is applicable to the Guinea pig as well.(A) Aural haematoma in a Guinea pig. (B) Incision made along the length of the aural haematoma on the inner surface of the pinna. (C) Transfixing mattress sutures from the inner surface of the pinna. The incision is left open, allowing the fluid to drain while the ear is healing. (D) The ear 2 weeks after suture removalOur Guinea pig case was a 2‐year‐old male with concurrent otitis externa. Under general anaesthesia, after shaving and scrubbing the area, with the animal in lateral recumbency, an incision along the length of the inner surface of the ear was made to drain the haematoma (Fig. A). Fluid, blood clots and fibrin adhesions were removed, and transfixing mattress sutures were placed parallel to the incision to maintain the inner and outer surfaces of the ear pinnae against each other (Fig. C). In the meantime, a sample of purulent material from the external ear channel was submitted for bacterial and fungal culture and sensitivity testing.The animal was discharged with doses of 2 mg/kg meloxicam once a day for 5 days and 10 mg/kg enrofloxacin twice a day for 3 weeks. The culture and sensitivity test confirmed enrofloxacin as the treatment of choice. After treatment, there was no evidence of otitis externa, and sutures were removed (Fig. D). No recurrences were observed in the next 3 months.Care must be taken to not suture ear blood vessels and leave the incision open so that fluid can drain while the ear is healing. As in other species, treating the underlying ear infection is mandatory.In the Guinea pig, as in the majority of rodents, the ear pinnae is rounded, while in small animals and rabbits, it is elongated; for this reason, more mattress sutures are needed for the correct juxtaposition of the two aspects of the ear pinnae.ReferencesFossum, T. W.(2007) Surgery of the ear. In: Small animal Surgery. 3th edn. Eds T. W. Fossum. Saunders Elsevier, St. Louis, MO, USA. pp 289‐316Capello, V.(2009) Small mammals as I see them. Exotic DVM 11, 27Csomos, R., Bosscher, G., Mans, C., et al. (2016) Surgical management of ear diseases in rabbit. Veterinary Clinics of North America Exotic Animal Practice, 19, 193‐195Jepson, L.(2015) Guine Pigs, Chinchillas, and Degus. In: Exotic Animal Medicine: A Quick Reference Guide. Ed L. Jepson. Elsevier, St. Louis, MO, USA. p 93 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Small Animal Practice Wiley

Aural haematoma in Guinea pig (Cavia porcellus)

Free
1 page

Loading next page...
1 Page
 
/lp/wiley/aural-haematoma-in-guinea-pig-cavia-porcellus-9uI4QCVFfS
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 British Small Animal Veterinary Association
ISSN
0022-4510
eISSN
1748-5827
D.O.I.
10.1111/jsap.12802
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aural haematoma occurs when blood accumulates under the skin of the pinna. It is usually caused by head shaking or ear scratching, often associated with an ear infection. It is well reported in dogs, cats and rabbits (Fossum , Capello , Csomos et al. ), but it is rare in rodents (Jepson ). In fact, to our knowledge, this clinical case is the first report in a Guinea pig (Fig. A). The treatment of choice, as described in previous species, consists of surgical drainage (Fossum , Capello , Csomos et al. ), and it is applicable to the Guinea pig as well.(A) Aural haematoma in a Guinea pig. (B) Incision made along the length of the aural haematoma on the inner surface of the pinna. (C) Transfixing mattress sutures from the inner surface of the pinna. The incision is left open, allowing the fluid to drain while the ear is healing. (D) The ear 2 weeks after suture removalOur Guinea pig case was a 2‐year‐old male with concurrent otitis externa. Under general anaesthesia, after shaving and scrubbing the area, with the animal in lateral recumbency, an incision along the length of the inner surface of the ear was made to drain the haematoma (Fig. A). Fluid, blood clots and fibrin adhesions were removed, and transfixing mattress sutures were placed parallel to the incision to maintain the inner and outer surfaces of the ear pinnae against each other (Fig. C). In the meantime, a sample of purulent material from the external ear channel was submitted for bacterial and fungal culture and sensitivity testing.The animal was discharged with doses of 2 mg/kg meloxicam once a day for 5 days and 10 mg/kg enrofloxacin twice a day for 3 weeks. The culture and sensitivity test confirmed enrofloxacin as the treatment of choice. After treatment, there was no evidence of otitis externa, and sutures were removed (Fig. D). No recurrences were observed in the next 3 months.Care must be taken to not suture ear blood vessels and leave the incision open so that fluid can drain while the ear is healing. As in other species, treating the underlying ear infection is mandatory.In the Guinea pig, as in the majority of rodents, the ear pinnae is rounded, while in small animals and rabbits, it is elongated; for this reason, more mattress sutures are needed for the correct juxtaposition of the two aspects of the ear pinnae.ReferencesFossum, T. W.(2007) Surgery of the ear. In: Small animal Surgery. 3th edn. Eds T. W. Fossum. Saunders Elsevier, St. Louis, MO, USA. pp 289‐316Capello, V.(2009) Small mammals as I see them. Exotic DVM 11, 27Csomos, R., Bosscher, G., Mans, C., et al. (2016) Surgical management of ear diseases in rabbit. Veterinary Clinics of North America Exotic Animal Practice, 19, 193‐195Jepson, L.(2015) Guine Pigs, Chinchillas, and Degus. In: Exotic Animal Medicine: A Quick Reference Guide. Ed L. Jepson. Elsevier, St. Louis, MO, USA. p 93

Journal

Journal of Small Animal PracticeWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial