Attitudinal politics in intergroup behaviour: Interpersonal vs. intergroup determinants of attitude change

Attitudinal politics in intergroup behaviour: Interpersonal vs. intergroup determinants of... Recent studies have found an attitudinal tendency for individuals to overconform to in‐group norms when the cognitive salience of their group membership is increased. The experiment described here investigated this effect in the context of anticipated intergroup interaction. Student subjects, selected to represent academic course groups, expected to debate social attitudes with members of a student out‐group or with other in‐group representatives. Subjects prepared for this debate individually by rehearsing relevant arguments or by engaging in intragroup discussion. Contrary to predictions derived from social identity theory, subjects forewarned of an intergroup debate moderated their positions on important in‐group attitudes. Attitude moderation was not supported by a cognitive reappraisal of relevant arguments. These findings suggest that the motive to present a favourable personal identity during intergroup interaction had a greater impact on expressed attitudes than subjects' social identity as representatives of a salient membership group. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Social Psychology Wiley

Attitudinal politics in intergroup behaviour: Interpersonal vs. intergroup determinants of attitude change

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/attitudinal-politics-in-intergroup-behaviour-interpersonal-vs-qxrZ0ZEeUe
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1984 The British Psychological Society
ISSN
0144-6665
eISSN
2044-8309
DOI
10.1111/j.2044-8309.1984.tb00649.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recent studies have found an attitudinal tendency for individuals to overconform to in‐group norms when the cognitive salience of their group membership is increased. The experiment described here investigated this effect in the context of anticipated intergroup interaction. Student subjects, selected to represent academic course groups, expected to debate social attitudes with members of a student out‐group or with other in‐group representatives. Subjects prepared for this debate individually by rehearsing relevant arguments or by engaging in intragroup discussion. Contrary to predictions derived from social identity theory, subjects forewarned of an intergroup debate moderated their positions on important in‐group attitudes. Attitude moderation was not supported by a cognitive reappraisal of relevant arguments. These findings suggest that the motive to present a favourable personal identity during intergroup interaction had a greater impact on expressed attitudes than subjects' social identity as representatives of a salient membership group.

Journal

British Journal of Social PsychologyWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1984

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off