Attitudes Toward Affirmative Action Plans Directed at Blacks: Effects of Plan and Individual Differences

Attitudes Toward Affirmative Action Plans Directed at Blacks: Effects of Plan and Individual... Non‐Black students (N= 178) completed a questionnaire that permitted tests of hypotheses about the bases of attitudes toward affirmative action plans (AAPs) directed at Blacks. Respondents positively evaluated 5 AAPs (race blind, eliminate discrimination, recruitment, training, proportional hiring) and rejected 2 AAPs (weak and strong preferential treatment). Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that attitudes toward the specific AAPs were entirely mediated by judgments of AAP fairness, but were only partly mediated by perceived threats to personal and collective self‐interest. Attitudes toward the specific AAPs were more strongly related to details of the AAPs than to individual differences or to attitudes toward affirmative action in general. Attitudes toward affirmative action in general varied with self‐interest and racism, but not with belief in the dominant ideology of opportunity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Social Psychology Wiley

Attitudes Toward Affirmative Action Plans Directed at Blacks: Effects of Plan and Individual Differences

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0021-9029
eISSN
1559-1816
DOI
10.1111/j.1559-1816.1995.tb01833.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Non‐Black students (N= 178) completed a questionnaire that permitted tests of hypotheses about the bases of attitudes toward affirmative action plans (AAPs) directed at Blacks. Respondents positively evaluated 5 AAPs (race blind, eliminate discrimination, recruitment, training, proportional hiring) and rejected 2 AAPs (weak and strong preferential treatment). Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that attitudes toward the specific AAPs were entirely mediated by judgments of AAP fairness, but were only partly mediated by perceived threats to personal and collective self‐interest. Attitudes toward the specific AAPs were more strongly related to details of the AAPs than to individual differences or to attitudes toward affirmative action in general. Attitudes toward affirmative action in general varied with self‐interest and racism, but not with belief in the dominant ideology of opportunity.

Journal

Journal of Applied Social PsychologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1995

References

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