Attitudes, Knowledge, and Behavior Toward Wildlife Among the Industrial Superpowers: United States, Japan, and Germany

Attitudes, Knowledge, and Behavior Toward Wildlife Among the Industrial Superpowers: United... This paper examines attitudes, knowledge, and behavior toward wildlife in the United States, Japan, and Germany. These countries collectively account for some 40% of the world's gross national product, and they have a major impact on the global environment. A similar conceptual and methodological approach was used to study national samples in each country over a roughly ten‐year period. The primary conceptual approach was a typology of basic attitudes toward animals. The main methodological procedure involved closed‐ended surveys of national samples in each country. Respondents in each country had a distinctive pattern of basic attitudes, knowledge, and behavior toward wildlife and its conservation. These differences are described and interpreted in terms of the biogeographical, cultural, and historical characteristics of each country. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Social Issues Wiley

Attitudes, Knowledge, and Behavior Toward Wildlife Among the Industrial Superpowers: United States, Japan, and Germany

Journal of Social Issues, Volume 49 (1) – Apr 1, 1993

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1993 The Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues
ISSN
0022-4537
eISSN
1540-4560
DOI
10.1111/j.1540-4560.1993.tb00908.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper examines attitudes, knowledge, and behavior toward wildlife in the United States, Japan, and Germany. These countries collectively account for some 40% of the world's gross national product, and they have a major impact on the global environment. A similar conceptual and methodological approach was used to study national samples in each country over a roughly ten‐year period. The primary conceptual approach was a typology of basic attitudes toward animals. The main methodological procedure involved closed‐ended surveys of national samples in each country. Respondents in each country had a distinctive pattern of basic attitudes, knowledge, and behavior toward wildlife and its conservation. These differences are described and interpreted in terms of the biogeographical, cultural, and historical characteristics of each country.

Journal

Journal of Social IssuesWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1993

References

  • Japanese perceptions of wildlife
    Kellert, Kellert
  • The little things that run the world (the importance and conservation of invertebrates)
    Wilson, Wilson

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