Asynchronous transmitter release: control of exocytosis and endocytosis at the salamander rod synapse.

Asynchronous transmitter release: control of exocytosis and endocytosis at the salamander rod... 1. We have studied exocytosis and endocytosis in the synaptic terminal of salamander rods using a combination of Ca2+ imaging, capacitance measurement and the photolysis of Ca2+ buffers. 2. The average cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration at the dark resting potential was 2‐4 microM. 3. An average cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration of 2‐4 microM maintained a high rate of continuous exocytosis and endocytosis. 4. Changes in the rate of exocytosis were followed in less than 0.7 s by compensatory changes in the rate of endocytosis. 5. Vesicle cycling in the rod synapse is specialized for graded transmission and differs from that previously described for synapses that release synchronized bursts of transmitter. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Physiology Wiley

Asynchronous transmitter release: control of exocytosis and endocytosis at the salamander rod synapse.

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 493 (1) – May 15, 1996

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2014 The Physiological Society
ISSN
0022-3751
eISSN
1469-7793
D.O.I.
10.1113/jphysiol.1996.sp021360
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1. We have studied exocytosis and endocytosis in the synaptic terminal of salamander rods using a combination of Ca2+ imaging, capacitance measurement and the photolysis of Ca2+ buffers. 2. The average cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration at the dark resting potential was 2‐4 microM. 3. An average cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration of 2‐4 microM maintained a high rate of continuous exocytosis and endocytosis. 4. Changes in the rate of exocytosis were followed in less than 0.7 s by compensatory changes in the rate of endocytosis. 5. Vesicle cycling in the rod synapse is specialized for graded transmission and differs from that previously described for synapses that release synchronized bursts of transmitter.

Journal

The Journal of PhysiologyWiley

Published: May 15, 1996

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