Association Update

Association Update Lourdes University adds bowlingLourdes University is expanding its intercollegiate athletics program with the addition of men's and women's bowling. During the fall semester of 2018, the teams will begin competing in the Wolverine‐Hoosier Athletic Conference of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics.The school is recruiting a full‐time head coach who will seek bowlers to fill 16 total positions on the eight‐member men's and women's teams. This spring, the school will announce where the bowling teams will practice and call home.NATA offers sleep health handoutThe National Athletic Trainers' Association has created a resource that provides tips on the power of sleep for student‐athletes. The resource was created in partnership with the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the American College Health Association.You can view, download, and print the handout at www.nata.org/sites/default/files/sleep‐infographic‐handout.pdf.NATA creates checklist for new hiresThe National Athletic Trainers' Association's Transition to Practice Workgroup recently released its findings about helping athletic trainers successfully transition into the field of employment.The findings state that the successful transition to practice must include both site‐ and setting‐specific orientation provided by the employer that is ongoing and begins at a reasonably early time following the employee's start date. The workgroup created a checklist of aspects that should be covered during orientation. This new‐hire checklist aims to help schools when bringing on a new athletic training employee.You can find the checklist at www.nata.org/sites/default/files/new‐hire‐checklist.pdf.NCAA committee recommends drug classes reflect worldwide standardThe National Collegiate Athletic Association's list of banned drug classes may soon more closely mirror the prohibited list governing sports organizations around the world.During a December meeting in Indianapolis, the NCAA's Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports voted to recommend legislation to each division that would amend the NCAA's banned drug classes to reflect the prohibited list established by the World Anti‐Doping Agency. The change would make the NCAA's policies on banned substances more consistent with international standards. The committee recognized the scientific expertise underpinning the WADA code and prohibited list, and said the change would reduce confusion among student‐athletes who compete in both NCAA and international competitions.The realignment would cause several changes in the NCAA's banned drug list. It would create a new class of banned drugs, the narcotic class, which would include heroin. Two other classes would be renamed: The illicit class would be known as the cannabinoids class, and would only include marijuana. The antiestrogen class would become the metabolic modulators class and would include all the substances previously included in the ­antiestrogen class.CSMAS made one exception to alignment with WADA: The committee didn't include glucocorticoids as an NCAA‐banned drug class, stating that there isn't an anti‐doping function for the collegiate athlete population and that those substances are used routinely in sports medicine.CSMAS also issued a statement to NCAA members reaffirming its commitment to deterring banned drug use by student‐athletes, and to encourage schools to use the NCAA Sport Science Institute's Substance Abuse Prevention Toolkit as a mechanism to support testing and intervention strategies on campuses. Relying on drug testing at NCAA championships alone isn't sufficient, particularly for deterring use of marijuana, according to the statement. Instead, deterrence requires a comprehensive approach that includes local intervention strategies on campuses throughout the year, the committee stated.To ensure that the intent of the NCAA's penalty for testing positive for performance‐enhancing drugs is properly reflected in the NCAA's legislation, CSMAS directed NCAA staff to perform a review of pertinent legislative language. The committee restated that the penalty's intent is to ensure student‐athletes testing positive for performance‐enhancing drugs should sit out a full season of competition and lose a year of eligibility. CSMAS asked staff to determine if the legislation, as currently written, reflects that intent. NCAA staff will provide guidance to the committee as to any next steps.Share your association news with usDo you have news about your association or conference that you'd like to share with our readers? Please contact the editor, Claudine McCarthy, at cmccarthy@wiley.com. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png College Athletics and the Law Wiley

Association Update

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© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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1943-7579
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Abstract

Lourdes University adds bowlingLourdes University is expanding its intercollegiate athletics program with the addition of men's and women's bowling. During the fall semester of 2018, the teams will begin competing in the Wolverine‐Hoosier Athletic Conference of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics.The school is recruiting a full‐time head coach who will seek bowlers to fill 16 total positions on the eight‐member men's and women's teams. This spring, the school will announce where the bowling teams will practice and call home.NATA offers sleep health handoutThe National Athletic Trainers' Association has created a resource that provides tips on the power of sleep for student‐athletes. The resource was created in partnership with the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the American College Health Association.You can view, download, and print the handout at www.nata.org/sites/default/files/sleep‐infographic‐handout.pdf.NATA creates checklist for new hiresThe National Athletic Trainers' Association's Transition to Practice Workgroup recently released its findings about helping athletic trainers successfully transition into the field of employment.The findings state that the successful transition to practice must include both site‐ and setting‐specific orientation provided by the employer that is ongoing and begins at a reasonably early time following the employee's start date. The workgroup created a checklist of aspects that should be covered during orientation. This new‐hire checklist aims to help schools when bringing on a new athletic training employee.You can find the checklist at www.nata.org/sites/default/files/new‐hire‐checklist.pdf.NCAA committee recommends drug classes reflect worldwide standardThe National Collegiate Athletic Association's list of banned drug classes may soon more closely mirror the prohibited list governing sports organizations around the world.During a December meeting in Indianapolis, the NCAA's Committee on Competitive Safeguards and Medical Aspects of Sports voted to recommend legislation to each division that would amend the NCAA's banned drug classes to reflect the prohibited list established by the World Anti‐Doping Agency. The change would make the NCAA's policies on banned substances more consistent with international standards. The committee recognized the scientific expertise underpinning the WADA code and prohibited list, and said the change would reduce confusion among student‐athletes who compete in both NCAA and international competitions.The realignment would cause several changes in the NCAA's banned drug list. It would create a new class of banned drugs, the narcotic class, which would include heroin. Two other classes would be renamed: The illicit class would be known as the cannabinoids class, and would only include marijuana. The antiestrogen class would become the metabolic modulators class and would include all the substances previously included in the ­antiestrogen class.CSMAS made one exception to alignment with WADA: The committee didn't include glucocorticoids as an NCAA‐banned drug class, stating that there isn't an anti‐doping function for the collegiate athlete population and that those substances are used routinely in sports medicine.CSMAS also issued a statement to NCAA members reaffirming its commitment to deterring banned drug use by student‐athletes, and to encourage schools to use the NCAA Sport Science Institute's Substance Abuse Prevention Toolkit as a mechanism to support testing and intervention strategies on campuses. Relying on drug testing at NCAA championships alone isn't sufficient, particularly for deterring use of marijuana, according to the statement. Instead, deterrence requires a comprehensive approach that includes local intervention strategies on campuses throughout the year, the committee stated.To ensure that the intent of the NCAA's penalty for testing positive for performance‐enhancing drugs is properly reflected in the NCAA's legislation, CSMAS directed NCAA staff to perform a review of pertinent legislative language. The committee restated that the penalty's intent is to ensure student‐athletes testing positive for performance‐enhancing drugs should sit out a full season of competition and lose a year of eligibility. CSMAS asked staff to determine if the legislation, as currently written, reflects that intent. NCAA staff will provide guidance to the committee as to any next steps.Share your association news with usDo you have news about your association or conference that you'd like to share with our readers? Please contact the editor, Claudine McCarthy, at cmccarthy@wiley.com.

Journal

College Athletics and the LawWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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