Association of soluble HLA‐G plasma levels with HLA‐G alleles

Association of soluble HLA‐G plasma levels with HLA‐G alleles Abstract: Soluble HLA‐G (sHLA‐G) molecules are found in the peripheral blood of healthy females and males, in cord blood and in amniotic fluids and discussed to be a mediator in maternal‐fetal tolerance. In this study we investigated whether there are allele‐specific differences in expression of sHLA‐G molecules. For this, the sHLA‐G plasma concentrations of 94 healthy unrelated individuals were measured by ELISA and correlated to their HLA‐G genotypes, as determined by sequence analysis of exon 2 and 3 of the HLA‐G gene. Mean sHLA‐G levels in individuals with the most common HLA‐G alleles G*01011 (27.0±2.1 SEM ng/ml, n=66), G*01012 (28.4±3.2 SEM ng/ml, n=34) were very similar. In contrast, individuals carrying the HLA‐G*01013 (8.1±1.7 SEM ng/ml, n=17) or the “null” allele HLA‐G*0105N (8.2±3.2 SEM ng/ml, n=7) presented significantly (Pc=0.001 and Pc<0.01, resp.) reduced sHLA‐G levels. Furthermore, individuals with the HLA‐G*01041 allele had significantly (Pc=0.004) increased sHLA‐G levels (42.5±4.6 SEM ng/ml, n=14). These results demonstrate that the generation of sHLA‐G molecules is associated to certain HLA‐G alleles and imply that sHLA‐G levels are under genetic control. As low and high sHLA‐G plasma levels did not segregate with HLA haplotypes including the HLA‐G*01013 or *01041 allele, additional mechanisms may be involved in the regulation of the individual sHLA‐G levels. Nevertheless, the existence of “low” and “high secretor” HLA‐G alleles further suggests different levels of functionality in immune regulation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Tissue Antigens Wiley

Association of soluble HLA‐G plasma levels with HLA‐G alleles

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0001-2815
eISSN
1399-0039
DOI
10.1034/j.1399-0039.2001.057001015.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: Soluble HLA‐G (sHLA‐G) molecules are found in the peripheral blood of healthy females and males, in cord blood and in amniotic fluids and discussed to be a mediator in maternal‐fetal tolerance. In this study we investigated whether there are allele‐specific differences in expression of sHLA‐G molecules. For this, the sHLA‐G plasma concentrations of 94 healthy unrelated individuals were measured by ELISA and correlated to their HLA‐G genotypes, as determined by sequence analysis of exon 2 and 3 of the HLA‐G gene. Mean sHLA‐G levels in individuals with the most common HLA‐G alleles G*01011 (27.0±2.1 SEM ng/ml, n=66), G*01012 (28.4±3.2 SEM ng/ml, n=34) were very similar. In contrast, individuals carrying the HLA‐G*01013 (8.1±1.7 SEM ng/ml, n=17) or the “null” allele HLA‐G*0105N (8.2±3.2 SEM ng/ml, n=7) presented significantly (Pc=0.001 and Pc<0.01, resp.) reduced sHLA‐G levels. Furthermore, individuals with the HLA‐G*01041 allele had significantly (Pc=0.004) increased sHLA‐G levels (42.5±4.6 SEM ng/ml, n=14). These results demonstrate that the generation of sHLA‐G molecules is associated to certain HLA‐G alleles and imply that sHLA‐G levels are under genetic control. As low and high sHLA‐G plasma levels did not segregate with HLA haplotypes including the HLA‐G*01013 or *01041 allele, additional mechanisms may be involved in the regulation of the individual sHLA‐G levels. Nevertheless, the existence of “low” and “high secretor” HLA‐G alleles further suggests different levels of functionality in immune regulation.

Journal

Tissue AntigensWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2001

References

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