Association of MGMT promoter methylation with tumorigenesis features in patients with ovarian cancer: A systematic meta‐analysis

Association of MGMT promoter methylation with tumorigenesis features in patients with ovarian... INTRODUCTIONOvarian cancer is the second most frequently and the most deadly gynecological malignancy among women (Siegel, Miller, & Jemal, ). According to global statistics, approximately 238,700 new cases were clinically diagnosed with ovarian carcinoma, and it killed 151,900 cases in the world in 2008 (Torre et al., ). Due to difficulties of early detection, most patients with ovarian cancer are diagnosed with high stages of this disease. Five‐year survival rate at advanced‐stage ovarian carcinoma remains <20% (Heintz et al., ; Kaja et al., ). Serous histology is the most common ovarian cancer, and other histotypes include mucinous, endometrioid, clear cell tumors, and undifferentiated carcinomas, etc. (Vang, Shih Ie, & Kurman, ).Epigenetic modifications, especially DNA methylation, a commonly observed epigenetic change, have been noted in the initiation and progression of human cancer (Ghavifekr Fakhr, Farshdousti Hagh, Shanehbandi, & Baradaran, ; Huang et al., ; Ma, Wang, Zhang, & Gazdar, ). Aberrant promoter methylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) is the most common methylation in many types of cancers (Smith et al., ; Yokoyama et al., ). O6‐methylguanine‐DNAmethyl‐transferase (MGMT), located on 10q26, a DNA repair gene, protects cells against the effects of alkylating agent chemotherapy by eliminating the alkylation of the O6 position of guanine (Esteller et al., http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Molecular Genetics & Genomic Medicine Wiley

Association of MGMT promoter methylation with tumorigenesis features in patients with ovarian cancer: A systematic meta‐analysis

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
ISSN
2324-9269
eISSN
2324-9269
D.O.I.
10.1002/mgg3.349
Publisher site
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Abstract

INTRODUCTIONOvarian cancer is the second most frequently and the most deadly gynecological malignancy among women (Siegel, Miller, & Jemal, ). According to global statistics, approximately 238,700 new cases were clinically diagnosed with ovarian carcinoma, and it killed 151,900 cases in the world in 2008 (Torre et al., ). Due to difficulties of early detection, most patients with ovarian cancer are diagnosed with high stages of this disease. Five‐year survival rate at advanced‐stage ovarian carcinoma remains <20% (Heintz et al., ; Kaja et al., ). Serous histology is the most common ovarian cancer, and other histotypes include mucinous, endometrioid, clear cell tumors, and undifferentiated carcinomas, etc. (Vang, Shih Ie, & Kurman, ).Epigenetic modifications, especially DNA methylation, a commonly observed epigenetic change, have been noted in the initiation and progression of human cancer (Ghavifekr Fakhr, Farshdousti Hagh, Shanehbandi, & Baradaran, ; Huang et al., ; Ma, Wang, Zhang, & Gazdar, ). Aberrant promoter methylation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) is the most common methylation in many types of cancers (Smith et al., ; Yokoyama et al., ). O6‐methylguanine‐DNAmethyl‐transferase (MGMT), located on 10q26, a DNA repair gene, protects cells against the effects of alkylating agent chemotherapy by eliminating the alkylation of the O6 position of guanine (Esteller et al.,

Journal

Molecular Genetics & Genomic MedicineWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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