Assigning Conservation Value: A Case Study from India

Assigning Conservation Value: A Case Study from India Abstract: We assign conservation values to ecological zones, habitat types, and specific localities of the south Indian district ofUttara Kannada on the basis of occurrence of bird taxa This is a two‐step process, assigning values first to individual bird taxa and second to spatial elements based on the occurrence of birds. The attributes of bird taxa considered are geographical distribution at four levels, habitat preferencq taxonomic position, and degree of endanger‐ment Tbe criteria translating the attributes into values are based on the assumption that the rarer, more taxonomically uniqq or more endangered the taxon, the more valuable it is The conservation value of a given bird taxon is thus a point in a seven‐dimensional space. We reduce this to three dimensions by using internal cowelation and clumping of values. Each spatial element may then be assigned a conservation value based on number of taxa and the total and mean conservation value along the three dimensions. The total values are highly correlated with number of taxa, permitting a simplification of the problem at the level of spatial elements to four dimensions. The analysis provides a basis for assigning specific conservation values to five ecological zones of the district; to fyteen natural, quasinatural, and manmade habitat types; and to 107 specific localities. Our analysis shows that degraded evergreen forests, exotic tree plantations, and urban settlements have low conservation value; the other habitat types considered rank high along one or more dimension. We also identza 12 different sets of 20 localities each that would maximize either the diversity of bird taxa or conservation value along the different dimensions. We thus attempt to synthesize diversity and quality of taxa to generate conservation prescriptions, whereas the existing methods tend to emphasize either rare or endangered taxa or total diversity. Such prescriptions would be one useful input into working out an overall conservation strategy for a geographical region. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Assigning Conservation Value: A Case Study from India

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 1991 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
DOI
10.1111/j.1523-1739.1991.tb00353.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract: We assign conservation values to ecological zones, habitat types, and specific localities of the south Indian district ofUttara Kannada on the basis of occurrence of bird taxa This is a two‐step process, assigning values first to individual bird taxa and second to spatial elements based on the occurrence of birds. The attributes of bird taxa considered are geographical distribution at four levels, habitat preferencq taxonomic position, and degree of endanger‐ment Tbe criteria translating the attributes into values are based on the assumption that the rarer, more taxonomically uniqq or more endangered the taxon, the more valuable it is The conservation value of a given bird taxon is thus a point in a seven‐dimensional space. We reduce this to three dimensions by using internal cowelation and clumping of values. Each spatial element may then be assigned a conservation value based on number of taxa and the total and mean conservation value along the three dimensions. The total values are highly correlated with number of taxa, permitting a simplification of the problem at the level of spatial elements to four dimensions. The analysis provides a basis for assigning specific conservation values to five ecological zones of the district; to fyteen natural, quasinatural, and manmade habitat types; and to 107 specific localities. Our analysis shows that degraded evergreen forests, exotic tree plantations, and urban settlements have low conservation value; the other habitat types considered rank high along one or more dimension. We also identza 12 different sets of 20 localities each that would maximize either the diversity of bird taxa or conservation value along the different dimensions. We thus attempt to synthesize diversity and quality of taxa to generate conservation prescriptions, whereas the existing methods tend to emphasize either rare or endangered taxa or total diversity. Such prescriptions would be one useful input into working out an overall conservation strategy for a geographical region.

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1991

References

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