Assessing the impact of forest disturbance on tropical invertebrates: some comments

Assessing the impact of forest disturbance on tropical invertebrates: some comments Hill & Hamer (1998) make the rational contention that species–abundance data relevant to selected invertebrate taxa, such as butterflies, might be used to monitor forest disturbance, but that the issue warrants further research. Nummelin (1998) shows cogently that fit of species–abundance data to the log‐normal distribution to monitor forest disturbance is unlikely to apply universally. The debate is timely since studies of the impact of forest disturbance on invertebrates, particularly tropical insects, have increased substantially during the past 10 years (e.g. Holloway 1977 ; Nummelin & Hanski 1989 ; Verhaagh 1991 ; Holloway, Kirk‐Spriggs & Chey 1992 ; Belshaw & Bolton 1993 ; Schowalter 1994 ; Didham . 1996 ; Eggleton . 1996 ; Nummelin 1996 ; Brown 1997 ; Didham 1997 ; Intachat, Holloway & Speight 1997 ; Malcolm 1997 ; Ozanne . 1997 ; Spitzer . 1997 ; Watt . 1997 ; Holloway 1998 ; Lawton . 1998 ; Rodriguez, Pearson & Barrerea 1998 ). This results both from general concerns about the rapid modification of tropical habitats and the recognition that invertebrates are highly sensitive to such modifications and much more amenable to statistical analyses than vertebrates (e.g. Collins & Thomas 1991 ; Kremen 1992 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Ecology Wiley

Assessing the impact of forest disturbance on tropical invertebrates: some comments

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0021-8901
eISSN
1365-2664
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1365-2664.1998.00311.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Hill & Hamer (1998) make the rational contention that species–abundance data relevant to selected invertebrate taxa, such as butterflies, might be used to monitor forest disturbance, but that the issue warrants further research. Nummelin (1998) shows cogently that fit of species–abundance data to the log‐normal distribution to monitor forest disturbance is unlikely to apply universally. The debate is timely since studies of the impact of forest disturbance on invertebrates, particularly tropical insects, have increased substantially during the past 10 years (e.g. Holloway 1977 ; Nummelin & Hanski 1989 ; Verhaagh 1991 ; Holloway, Kirk‐Spriggs & Chey 1992 ; Belshaw & Bolton 1993 ; Schowalter 1994 ; Didham . 1996 ; Eggleton . 1996 ; Nummelin 1996 ; Brown 1997 ; Didham 1997 ; Intachat, Holloway & Speight 1997 ; Malcolm 1997 ; Ozanne . 1997 ; Spitzer . 1997 ; Watt . 1997 ; Holloway 1998 ; Lawton . 1998 ; Rodriguez, Pearson & Barrerea 1998 ). This results both from general concerns about the rapid modification of tropical habitats and the recognition that invertebrates are highly sensitive to such modifications and much more amenable to statistical analyses than vertebrates (e.g. Collins & Thomas 1991 ; Kremen 1992

Journal

Journal of Applied EcologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1998

References

  • Using species abundance models as indicators of habitat disturbance in tropical forests.
    Hill, Hill; Hamer, Hamer
  • Terrestrial arthropod assemblages: their use in conservation planning.
    Kremen, Kremen; Colwell, Colwell; Erwin, Erwin; Murphy, Murphy; Noss, Noss; Sanjayan, Sanjayan
  • Taxonomic focus and quality control in insect surveys for biodiversity conservation.
    New, New
  • Seasonality of sap‐sucking insects (Auchenorrhyncha, Hemiptera) feeding on Ficus (Moraceae) in a lowland rain forest in New Guinea.
    Novotny, Novotny; Basset, Basset
  • A test for the adequacy of bioindicator taxa: are tiger beetles (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae) appropriate indicators for monitoring the degradation of tropical forests in Venezuela?
    Rodriguez, Rodriguez; Pearson, Pearson; Barrerea, Barrerea
  • Effects of small‐scale disturbance on butterfly communities of an Indochinese montane rainforest.
    Spitzer, Spitzer; Jaros, Jaros; Havelka, Havelka; Leps, Leps
  • Detection of pollution effects on marine macrobenthos: further evaluation of the species abundance/biomass method.
    Warwick, Warwick; Pearson, Pearson

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