ASSESSING NEW ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES USING AN ENERGY SYSTEM MODEL WITH ENDOGENIZED EXPERIENCE CURVES

ASSESSING NEW ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES USING AN ENERGY SYSTEM MODEL WITH ENDOGENIZED EXPERIENCE CURVES Most energy systems models treat reductions of technology investment costs exogenously. In these models, investments may be postponed until the costs become low. This model behaviour is unreasonable, since early investments are necessary to realize the cost reductions, a phenomenon known as the experience effect. We have developed a global energy systems model with endogenized experience curves, and have conducted a pilot study to demonstrate the new insights which can be obtained with the model. In this initial application, we study the emergence of new energy technologies such as photovoltaics and fuel cells, competition between technologies and technology lock‐in effects. © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Energy Research Wiley

ASSESSING NEW ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES USING AN ENERGY SYSTEM MODEL WITH ENDOGENIZED EXPERIENCE CURVES

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
0363-907X
eISSN
1099-114X
DOI
10.1002/(SICI)1099-114X(19970325)21:4<385::AID-ER275>3.0.CO;2-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Most energy systems models treat reductions of technology investment costs exogenously. In these models, investments may be postponed until the costs become low. This model behaviour is unreasonable, since early investments are necessary to realize the cost reductions, a phenomenon known as the experience effect. We have developed a global energy systems model with endogenized experience curves, and have conducted a pilot study to demonstrate the new insights which can be obtained with the model. In this initial application, we study the emergence of new energy technologies such as photovoltaics and fuel cells, competition between technologies and technology lock‐in effects. © 1997 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

International Journal of Energy ResearchWiley

Published: Mar 25, 1997

References

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