Are tanning salons in compliance with German law? An evaluation based on a nationwide representative survey

Are tanning salons in compliance with German law? An evaluation based on a nationwide... INTRODUCTIONOver the past decades, the incidence of malignant melanoma has increased dramatically in developed countries. Meta‐analyses have shown that sunbed use is associated with a significant increase in the risk of melanoma. Moreover, the relative risk of malignant melanoma increases by up to 59% to 75% for people whose sunbed use started before the age of 35. Consequently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified indoor tanning devices and the entire ultraviolet spectrum as carcinogenic to humans.Given the evidence for increased skin cancer risk due to the use of indoor tanning devices, a number of countries have adopted regulations for the use of indoor tanning. By 2011, 11 countries and a number of states and provinces in Canada, the United States and Australia had passed laws restricting indoor tanning for persons younger than 18 years.In Germany, the use of sunbeds is regulated by 2 recently adopted laws. First, the Nonionizing Radiation Law, banning the use of artificial tanning devices by minors, was passed in 2009. However, our previous study has shown that minors were still using sunbeds despite this legal regulation. Second, a regulation of hazardous artificial ultraviolet radiation (UVR regulation) was passed in 2012 to regulate the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine Wiley

Are tanning salons in compliance with German law? An evaluation based on a nationwide representative survey

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0905-4383
eISSN
1600-0781
D.O.I.
10.1111/phpp.12351
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONOver the past decades, the incidence of malignant melanoma has increased dramatically in developed countries. Meta‐analyses have shown that sunbed use is associated with a significant increase in the risk of melanoma. Moreover, the relative risk of malignant melanoma increases by up to 59% to 75% for people whose sunbed use started before the age of 35. Consequently, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified indoor tanning devices and the entire ultraviolet spectrum as carcinogenic to humans.Given the evidence for increased skin cancer risk due to the use of indoor tanning devices, a number of countries have adopted regulations for the use of indoor tanning. By 2011, 11 countries and a number of states and provinces in Canada, the United States and Australia had passed laws restricting indoor tanning for persons younger than 18 years.In Germany, the use of sunbeds is regulated by 2 recently adopted laws. First, the Nonionizing Radiation Law, banning the use of artificial tanning devices by minors, was passed in 2009. However, our previous study has shown that minors were still using sunbeds despite this legal regulation. Second, a regulation of hazardous artificial ultraviolet radiation (UVR regulation) was passed in 2012 to regulate the

Journal

Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & PhotomedicineWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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