Are New Zealand's Nothofagus species in equilibrium with their environment?

Are New Zealand's Nothofagus species in equilibrium with their environment? Abstract. Past explanations of the large disjunctions in the distribution of New Zealand's four Nothofagus species have emphasized displacement during glacial cycles followed by slow re‐occupation of suitable sites, or the effects of plate tectonics coupled with ecological and/or environmental limitations to further spread. In this study the degree of equilibrium between Nothofagus distribution and environment was compared with that of other widespread tree species by statistical analysis. Generalized additive regression models were used to relate species distribution data to estimates of temperature, solar radiation, soil water deficit, atmospheric humidity, lithology and drainage. For each species, the amount of spatial patterning remaining unexplained by environment was assessed by adding a variable describing species presence/absence on adjacent plots. Results indicate that Nothofagus species occur more frequently in environments suboptimal for tree growth, i.e. having various combinations of cool temperatures, low winter solar radiation, high root‐zone water deficit, low humidity, and infertile granitic substrates. Despite these demonstrated preferences, they exhibit substantially more spatial clustering which is unexplained by environment, than most other widespread tree species. Predictions formed from regressions using environment alone confirm that several major Nothofagus disjunctions are not explicable in terms of the environmental factors used in this analysis, but more likely reflect the effects of historic displacement coupled with slowness to invade forest dominated by more rapidly dispersing endomycorrhizal species. The technique used in this study for detecting residual spatial autocorrelation after fitting explanatory variables has potentially wide application in other studies where either regression or ordination techniques are used for analysis of compositional data. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Vegetation Science Wiley

Are New Zealand's Nothofagus species in equilibrium with their environment?

Journal of Vegetation Science, Volume 9 (5) – Oct 1, 1998

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1998 IAVS ‐ the International Association of Vegetation Science
ISSN
1100-9233
eISSN
1654-1103
D.O.I.
10.2307/3237290
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Past explanations of the large disjunctions in the distribution of New Zealand's four Nothofagus species have emphasized displacement during glacial cycles followed by slow re‐occupation of suitable sites, or the effects of plate tectonics coupled with ecological and/or environmental limitations to further spread. In this study the degree of equilibrium between Nothofagus distribution and environment was compared with that of other widespread tree species by statistical analysis. Generalized additive regression models were used to relate species distribution data to estimates of temperature, solar radiation, soil water deficit, atmospheric humidity, lithology and drainage. For each species, the amount of spatial patterning remaining unexplained by environment was assessed by adding a variable describing species presence/absence on adjacent plots. Results indicate that Nothofagus species occur more frequently in environments suboptimal for tree growth, i.e. having various combinations of cool temperatures, low winter solar radiation, high root‐zone water deficit, low humidity, and infertile granitic substrates. Despite these demonstrated preferences, they exhibit substantially more spatial clustering which is unexplained by environment, than most other widespread tree species. Predictions formed from regressions using environment alone confirm that several major Nothofagus disjunctions are not explicable in terms of the environmental factors used in this analysis, but more likely reflect the effects of historic displacement coupled with slowness to invade forest dominated by more rapidly dispersing endomycorrhizal species. The technique used in this study for detecting residual spatial autocorrelation after fitting explanatory variables has potentially wide application in other studies where either regression or ordination techniques are used for analysis of compositional data.

Journal

Journal of Vegetation ScienceWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1998

References

  • Current approaches to modelling the environmental niche of eucalypts: implications for management of forest biodiversity
    Austin, Austin; Meyers, Meyers
  • Plant functional types and climate at the global scale
    Box, Box
  • Modelling impacts of climate change on the spatial distribution of zonal communities in Switzerland
    Brzeziecki, Brzeziecki; Kienast, Kienast; Wildi, Wildi
  • Plant functional types and ecosystem function in relation to global change
    Diaz, Diaz; Cabido, Cabido
  • Climatic relationships of some New Zealand forest tree species
    Leathwick, Leathwick
  • Forest pattern, climate and vulcanism in central North Island, New Zealand
    Leathwick, Leathwick; Mitchell, Mitchell
  • Ecological response surfaces for North American boreal tree species and their use in forest classification
    Lenihan, Lenihan

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