Approaches to dynamic equilibrium in theoretical simulations of slope development

Approaches to dynamic equilibrium in theoretical simulations of slope development The model SLOP3D is used to identify characteristic aspects of slope development under different conditions. A series of slopes along the Kall valley in the northern Eifel is reproduced by a developmental sequence of model slopes. The spatial and temporal variations of the components of slope development systems (relief, slope form, weathering rates, denudation rates) are discussed by means of mass movement and wash denudation models. The negative feedbacks between system components create a tendency towards the establishment of a dynamic equilibrium which is reached, however, only if the endogenic and exogenic conditions remain constant for the required relaxation time. The latter is shown to be a function of slope length, of the rate of uplift, of the denudational process type, and of the intensity of exogenic inputs (e.g. precipitation). Varying rock resistance leads to the development of shield inselbergs only if the rate of denudation becomes higher than the maximum possible weathering rate of the resistant bedrock. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Earth Surface Processes and Landforms Wiley

Approaches to dynamic equilibrium in theoretical simulations of slope development

Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, Volume 12 (1) – Jan 1, 1987

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
0197-9337
eISSN
1096-9837
D.O.I.
10.1002/esp.3290120103
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The model SLOP3D is used to identify characteristic aspects of slope development under different conditions. A series of slopes along the Kall valley in the northern Eifel is reproduced by a developmental sequence of model slopes. The spatial and temporal variations of the components of slope development systems (relief, slope form, weathering rates, denudation rates) are discussed by means of mass movement and wash denudation models. The negative feedbacks between system components create a tendency towards the establishment of a dynamic equilibrium which is reached, however, only if the endogenic and exogenic conditions remain constant for the required relaxation time. The latter is shown to be a function of slope length, of the rate of uplift, of the denudational process type, and of the intensity of exogenic inputs (e.g. precipitation). Varying rock resistance leads to the development of shield inselbergs only if the rate of denudation becomes higher than the maximum possible weathering rate of the resistant bedrock.

Journal

Earth Surface Processes and LandformsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1987

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ; ;

References

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