Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Applications and Implementation: AN EXPERIMENTAL COMPARISON OF CELLULAR (GROUP TECHNOLOGY) LAYOUT WITH PROCESS LAYOUT

Applications and Implementation: AN EXPERIMENTAL COMPARISON OF CELLULAR (GROUP TECHNOLOGY) LAYOUT... This study compares different strategies for arranging machines in a facility. Computer simulation of two different machine shops was used to compare process layout (the arrangement of groups of machines where the machines within a group are interchangeable) to cellular layout designed using group technology concepts (the use of manufacturing cells where each cell contains different types of machines dedicated to the production of similar parts). Four layout strategies, including process layout, cellular layout, and two hybrid layouts, were compared in two machine‐shop models. The shops that used cellular layouts had shorter setup times, lower machine utilization, and shorter distances traveled, on average. The shops with process layout, however, had better performance on queue‐related statistics such as work‐in‐process inventory level and average flow time. This suggests that a well‐organized traditional job shop may be able to achieve overall performance that at least is comparable to that of the same shop using cellular (group technology) layout. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Decision Sciences Wiley

Applications and Implementation: AN EXPERIMENTAL COMPARISON OF CELLULAR (GROUP TECHNOLOGY) LAYOUT WITH PROCESS LAYOUT

Decision Sciences , Volume 18 (4) – Oct 1, 1987

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/applications-and-implementation-an-experimental-comparison-of-cellular-8N6L5aeSRi

References (20)

Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0011-7315
eISSN
1540-5915
DOI
10.1111/j.1540-5915.1987.tb01547.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study compares different strategies for arranging machines in a facility. Computer simulation of two different machine shops was used to compare process layout (the arrangement of groups of machines where the machines within a group are interchangeable) to cellular layout designed using group technology concepts (the use of manufacturing cells where each cell contains different types of machines dedicated to the production of similar parts). Four layout strategies, including process layout, cellular layout, and two hybrid layouts, were compared in two machine‐shop models. The shops that used cellular layouts had shorter setup times, lower machine utilization, and shorter distances traveled, on average. The shops with process layout, however, had better performance on queue‐related statistics such as work‐in‐process inventory level and average flow time. This suggests that a well‐organized traditional job shop may be able to achieve overall performance that at least is comparable to that of the same shop using cellular (group technology) layout.

Journal

Decision SciencesWiley

Published: Oct 1, 1987

Keywords: ; ;

There are no references for this article.