Application of fourier analysis to the visibility of gratings

Application of fourier analysis to the visibility of gratings 1. The contrast thresholds of a variety of grating patterns have been measured over a wide range of spatial frequencies. 2. Contrast thresholds for the detection of gratings whose luminance profiles are sine, square, rectangular or saw‐tooth waves can be simply related using Fourier theory. 3. Over a wide range of spatial frequencies the contrast threshold of a grating is determined only by the amplitude of the fundamental Fourier component of its wave form. 4. Gratings of complex wave form cannot be distinguished from sine‐wave gratings until their contrast has been raised to a level at which the higher harmonic components reach their independent threshold. 5. These findings can be explained by the existence within the nervous system of linearly operating independent mechanisms selectively sensitive to limited ranges of spatial frequencies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Physiology Wiley

Application of fourier analysis to the visibility of gratings

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 197 (3) – Aug 1, 1968

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2014 The Physiological Society
ISSN
0022-3751
eISSN
1469-7793
DOI
10.1113/jphysiol.1968.sp008574
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1. The contrast thresholds of a variety of grating patterns have been measured over a wide range of spatial frequencies. 2. Contrast thresholds for the detection of gratings whose luminance profiles are sine, square, rectangular or saw‐tooth waves can be simply related using Fourier theory. 3. Over a wide range of spatial frequencies the contrast threshold of a grating is determined only by the amplitude of the fundamental Fourier component of its wave form. 4. Gratings of complex wave form cannot be distinguished from sine‐wave gratings until their contrast has been raised to a level at which the higher harmonic components reach their independent threshold. 5. These findings can be explained by the existence within the nervous system of linearly operating independent mechanisms selectively sensitive to limited ranges of spatial frequencies.

Journal

The Journal of PhysiologyWiley

Published: Aug 1, 1968

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