Anoxia and endothelium‐dependent reactivity of the canine femoral artery.

Anoxia and endothelium‐dependent reactivity of the canine femoral artery. Experiments were designed to determine the role of the endothelium in the responsiveness of the arterial wall to anoxia. Paired rings of canine femoral arteries were mounted for isometric tension recording in organ chambers filled with aerated Krebs‐Ringer bicarbonate solution (37 degrees C). One ring served as control; in the other the intimal layer was removed mechanically. Anoxia was induced by gassing the organ chamber with 95% N2/5% CO2. In control rings anoxia augmented contractile responses to noradrenaline, KCl and BaCl2. On return to O2 the contractile responses were transiently depressed. Removal of the endothelium reduced the anoxic augmentation, but did not affect the post‐anoxic inhibition. Indomethacin did not affect the response to anoxia. Anoxia abolished the endothelium‐dependent inhibitory effect of acetylcholine and thrombin, reduced that of adenosine triphosphate, but augmented that of arachidonic acid. These experiments indicate that endothelial cells may contribute to anoxic facilitation of the responsiveness of the canine arterial wall. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Physiology Wiley

Anoxia and endothelium‐dependent reactivity of the canine femoral artery.

The Journal of Physiology, Volume 335 (1) – Feb 1, 1983

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2014 The Physiological Society
ISSN
0022-3751
eISSN
1469-7793
DOI
10.1113/jphysiol.1983.sp014519
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Experiments were designed to determine the role of the endothelium in the responsiveness of the arterial wall to anoxia. Paired rings of canine femoral arteries were mounted for isometric tension recording in organ chambers filled with aerated Krebs‐Ringer bicarbonate solution (37 degrees C). One ring served as control; in the other the intimal layer was removed mechanically. Anoxia was induced by gassing the organ chamber with 95% N2/5% CO2. In control rings anoxia augmented contractile responses to noradrenaline, KCl and BaCl2. On return to O2 the contractile responses were transiently depressed. Removal of the endothelium reduced the anoxic augmentation, but did not affect the post‐anoxic inhibition. Indomethacin did not affect the response to anoxia. Anoxia abolished the endothelium‐dependent inhibitory effect of acetylcholine and thrombin, reduced that of adenosine triphosphate, but augmented that of arachidonic acid. These experiments indicate that endothelial cells may contribute to anoxic facilitation of the responsiveness of the canine arterial wall.

Journal

The Journal of PhysiologyWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1983

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