Annotation: Childhood Bereavement Following Parental Death

Annotation: Childhood Bereavement Following Parental Death Psychological outcomes in children who have experienced the death of a parent are heterogeneous. One child in five is likely to develop psychiatric disorder. In the year following bereavement, children commonly display grief, distress, and dysphoria. Nonspecific emotional and behavioural difficulties among children are often reported by surviving parents and the bereaved children themselves. The highest rates of reported difficulties are found in boys. This review identifies the moderating and mediating variables that lead to some children being more vulnerable to disturbance than others following parental death. Limitations and gaps in the recent bereavement literature are identified. Theoretical and methodological advances that are necessary for a coherent account of childhood bereavement are outlined. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry Wiley

Annotation: Childhood Bereavement Following Parental Death

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2000 Association for Child Psychology and Psychiatry
ISSN
0021-9630
eISSN
1469-7610
DOI
10.1111/1469-7610.00670
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Psychological outcomes in children who have experienced the death of a parent are heterogeneous. One child in five is likely to develop psychiatric disorder. In the year following bereavement, children commonly display grief, distress, and dysphoria. Nonspecific emotional and behavioural difficulties among children are often reported by surviving parents and the bereaved children themselves. The highest rates of reported difficulties are found in boys. This review identifies the moderating and mediating variables that lead to some children being more vulnerable to disturbance than others following parental death. Limitations and gaps in the recent bereavement literature are identified. Theoretical and methodological advances that are necessary for a coherent account of childhood bereavement are outlined.

Journal

The Journal of Child Psychology and PsychiatryWiley

Published: Oct 1, 2000

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