“Anatomy is the great ocean of intelligence upon which the true physician must sail”

“Anatomy is the great ocean of intelligence upon which the true physician must sail” The surgeon John E. Link () stated, “Anatomy is the great ocean of intelligence upon which the true physician must sail.” This quote was made in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1893. Link was a graduate of Chicago Medical College in 1865. He was also a surgeon for the U.S. Volunteers during the Civil War, a faculty member at Indianapolis Medical College and later, surgeon at Terre Haute for the Vandalia Railroad. He died in 1912 at the age of 73.Such an ocean of intelligence borne out in anatomy is seen in this issue of Clinical Anatomy. Papers that will surely be of interest to our readership include the following: Right‐left propensity of cardiogenic cerebral embolism in standard versus bovine aortic arch variants, teaching of the anatomical sciences with a blended learning approach, positional relationship between the pectoralis major and external abdominal oblique muscles for consideration during dual‐plane breast augmentation procedures, the anatomy of the perineal branch of the sciatic nerve, extrinsic and intrinsic blood supply to the optic chiasm, pictorial essay of ultrasound‐reconstructed coronal plane images of the uterus in different uterine pathologies, 3D reconstruction (Fig. ) of peripheral nerves from optical projection tomography (OPT) images as a method for studying fascicular interconnections and intraneural plexuses, and systematic reviews versus narrative reviews in clinical anatomy and using such methodological approaches in the era of evidence‐based anatomy.3D reconstruction of fascicles of the median nerve. (a) The fascicles are not rectilinear; (b) 3D reconstruction technique allowed fascicles to be clearly delineated.These topics in this issue of the Journal illustrate that today more than ever, clinical anatomy has a very important role in medical education and the continued best practice of medicine and surgery.REFERENCELink JE. 1893. Advancement of Surgery. J Am Med Assoc 20:198–199. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Anatomy Wiley

“Anatomy is the great ocean of intelligence upon which the true physician must sail”

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Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
0897-3806
eISSN
1098-2353
D.O.I.
10.1002/ca.23067
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Abstract

The surgeon John E. Link () stated, “Anatomy is the great ocean of intelligence upon which the true physician must sail.” This quote was made in the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1893. Link was a graduate of Chicago Medical College in 1865. He was also a surgeon for the U.S. Volunteers during the Civil War, a faculty member at Indianapolis Medical College and later, surgeon at Terre Haute for the Vandalia Railroad. He died in 1912 at the age of 73.Such an ocean of intelligence borne out in anatomy is seen in this issue of Clinical Anatomy. Papers that will surely be of interest to our readership include the following: Right‐left propensity of cardiogenic cerebral embolism in standard versus bovine aortic arch variants, teaching of the anatomical sciences with a blended learning approach, positional relationship between the pectoralis major and external abdominal oblique muscles for consideration during dual‐plane breast augmentation procedures, the anatomy of the perineal branch of the sciatic nerve, extrinsic and intrinsic blood supply to the optic chiasm, pictorial essay of ultrasound‐reconstructed coronal plane images of the uterus in different uterine pathologies, 3D reconstruction (Fig. ) of peripheral nerves from optical projection tomography (OPT) images as a method for studying fascicular interconnections and intraneural plexuses, and systematic reviews versus narrative reviews in clinical anatomy and using such methodological approaches in the era of evidence‐based anatomy.3D reconstruction of fascicles of the median nerve. (a) The fascicles are not rectilinear; (b) 3D reconstruction technique allowed fascicles to be clearly delineated.These topics in this issue of the Journal illustrate that today more than ever, clinical anatomy has a very important role in medical education and the continued best practice of medicine and surgery.REFERENCELink JE. 1893. Advancement of Surgery. J Am Med Assoc 20:198–199.

Journal

Clinical AnatomyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

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