ANALYSIS OF THE PROTEIN CONSTITUENTS OF DRIP FROM THAWED FISH MUSCLE

ANALYSIS OF THE PROTEIN CONSTITUENTS OF DRIP FROM THAWED FISH MUSCLE Fishery products preserved by freezing potentially have characteristics more like those of fresh fish than do products preserved by any other process currently in use. Despite the widespread acceptance of frozen fishery products, however, a decided consumer preference for fresh fish often exists. The reasons for this preference may be attributed to a progressive deterioration in quality of the frozen product, particularly after prolonged cold storage. When fish muscle is frozen and subsequently thawed, a cloudy, liquid phase called drip exudes from the muscle. In addition, when the thawed muscle is cooked, the surface of the cooked flesh often is coated with an unsightly white deposit of coagulated drip proteins, commonly referred to as curd. Further, the thawed fish when cooked often toughens and becomes fibrous as compared with cooked fish that has never been frozen. The rate of quality deterioration in frozen fish is related not only to cold storage conditions but also to species differences. Several different theories have been proposed concerning the origin of drip in frozen fish,muscle and reviews dealing with this problem and factors influencing the production of drip have been discussed elsewhere (3, 7). The most recent evidence (7, 14, 17). however, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Food Science Wiley

ANALYSIS OF THE PROTEIN CONSTITUENTS OF DRIP FROM THAWED FISH MUSCLE

Journal of Food Science, Volume 23 (2) – Mar 1, 1958

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1958 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-1147
eISSN
1750-3841
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-2621.1958.tb17551.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Fishery products preserved by freezing potentially have characteristics more like those of fresh fish than do products preserved by any other process currently in use. Despite the widespread acceptance of frozen fishery products, however, a decided consumer preference for fresh fish often exists. The reasons for this preference may be attributed to a progressive deterioration in quality of the frozen product, particularly after prolonged cold storage. When fish muscle is frozen and subsequently thawed, a cloudy, liquid phase called drip exudes from the muscle. In addition, when the thawed muscle is cooked, the surface of the cooked flesh often is coated with an unsightly white deposit of coagulated drip proteins, commonly referred to as curd. Further, the thawed fish when cooked often toughens and becomes fibrous as compared with cooked fish that has never been frozen. The rate of quality deterioration in frozen fish is related not only to cold storage conditions but also to species differences. Several different theories have been proposed concerning the origin of drip in frozen fish,muscle and reviews dealing with this problem and factors influencing the production of drip have been discussed elsewhere (3, 7). The most recent evidence (7, 14, 17). however,

Journal

Journal of Food ScienceWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1958

References

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