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An unsupported common view: Comparing Japan and the U.S. on individualism/collectivism

An unsupported common view: Comparing Japan and the U.S. on individualism/collectivism It has long been believed that the Japanese are more collectivistic than the Americans. To assess the validity of this common view, we reviewed 15 empirical studies that compared these two nations on individualism/collectivism. Surprisingly, 14 studies did not support the common view; the only study that supported it turned out to bear little relevance to the ordinary definition of individualism/collectivism. An examination of the supportive evidence of the common view disclosed that this view had been formed on an unexpectedly flimsy ground. It further turned out that the wide acceptance of the common view may have been the result of the fundamental attribution error, which may have led to an underestimation of situational factors in interpreting the past obviously collectivistic behavior of the Japanese. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Asian Journal of Social Psychology Wiley

An unsupported common view: Comparing Japan and the U.S. on individualism/collectivism

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1367-2223
eISSN
1467-839X
DOI
10.1111/1467-839X.00043
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

It has long been believed that the Japanese are more collectivistic than the Americans. To assess the validity of this common view, we reviewed 15 empirical studies that compared these two nations on individualism/collectivism. Surprisingly, 14 studies did not support the common view; the only study that supported it turned out to bear little relevance to the ordinary definition of individualism/collectivism. An examination of the supportive evidence of the common view disclosed that this view had been formed on an unexpectedly flimsy ground. It further turned out that the wide acceptance of the common view may have been the result of the fundamental attribution error, which may have led to an underestimation of situational factors in interpreting the past obviously collectivistic behavior of the Japanese.

Journal

Asian Journal of Social PsychologyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1999

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